Code-Two High: The Run of His Life, pp. 51- 52

Officer John Edwards and his partner, a trainee named Patricia Milewski, go to Brentwood to check out a 911 call. Edwards presses a buzzer, a woman indentifying herself as the housekeeper steps out.

She said, “There’s no problem here,” then told the officers to leave.

After a few minutes of this back-and-forth, a blonde woman staggered out from the heavy bushes behind the gate and started yelling to the officers, “He’s going to kill me! He’s going to kill me!” She pounded on the button that opened the gate and then flung herself into Edwards’s arms.

“Who’s going to kill you?” Edwards asked.

“O. J.”

“O. J. who?”

As she got into the squad car, the woman turned and said to Edwards, “You guys never do anything. You never do anything. You come out. You’ve been here eight times. And you never do anything about him.”

Then O. J. walks out of his house, wearing only a bathrobe and screams to the officers, “I don’t want that woman in my bed anymore! I got two other women . . . ”

The officer explains that he is going to have to take O. J. in.

O. J. : “You’ve been out here eight times before and now you’re going to arrest me for this?”

What really kills is that the housekeeper, who witnessed everything, tells the officers to leave. Women who enable abusers are the worst.

Not satisfied with her attempts to keep the police from taking Nicole’s statement, the housekeeper walks over to Nicole, seated in the squad car, and pleads, “Don’t do this, Nicole, come inside.” Then she tries pulling Nicole from the car.

It turned out there were two other women staying in the house, one of whom was having sex with O. J. Neither of these two women tried to help Nicole while O. J. was beating her.

Enablers are bad, but women enablers are the worst. Here’s looking at you, housekeeper! And the two women houseguests. The sounds of the beating must have been heard all over the house. O. J. said it was “a mutual-type wrestling match.”

The police discussed the case with prosecutors. They found O. J.’s explanation credible (That’s like asking a murderer for his version of events and then putting more credence on the murderer’s version than the victim’s because … well, because the victim’s dead. Or might as well be): “If this was just a … drunken brawl after a New Year’s Eve party, a prosecutor” said, “then maybe they should just let it drop.”

The police steer Nicole Simpson towards “mediation” rather than prosecution. That was pretty much the day Nicole Simpson’s fate was sealed. If she had filed charges, she might still have been killed by O. J., but at least he’d be in jail.

Nicole Simpson had called the police eight times. No one thought she should file charges.

Let me put it this way: No woman waits in the bushes for the police to come, with a black eye, and a lump on her forehead, and a cut lip, from “mutual drunken wrestling.” Why they put more credibility on his version than hers is beyond me. Maybe they liked watching USC football too much?

There was one woman police officer who came to the house that night, but she was a trainee. Doubt she would contradict her superiors.

Stay tuned.

Stanford Spokes: A Summer 2020 Learning Project

One Summer. 6 Students. 6 Bikes. 10 States.

This summer, six Stanford students will spend three months biking from San Francisco to D.C., teaching hands-on educational workshops to local middle school and high school students along the way.

Read all about the project here.

Map+Final

Stay tuned.

Imelda Out-Colins Colin

Anne Glenconner pinch-hits for an ill Princess Margaret in Manila, where she and her husband are wined and dined by Imelda:

“The singing sprees continued until 3 a.m., when she would drop us off at the house, only to arrive again at eight the next day. Colin continued to be an asset, although after enduring a few days of Madame Marcos’s intense entertainment, he declared, “I simply can’t stand this anymore. This is the most exhausting thing I’ve ever done. I’m going home.” — Lady-in-Waiting: My Extraordinary Life in the Shadow of the Crown, p. 211

And Colin is no slouch, either: among other things, he single-handedly turned the island of Mustique into a playground for the wealthy.

The thing about Filipinos: their hospitality is relentless. And if you shun them, they do bear grudges.

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

Happening to Neelay in Redwood City, California: The Overstory, p. 279

Really love these Redwood City scenes (where Neelay bases his electronic game company), just sayin’.

Below, a scene self has just finished reading (Neelay’s just had a telephone conversation with his mother, who’s misconstrued his reference to his female caregiver as a reference to a fiancĂ©e):

“Goodness. These things take time, Neelay.”

When they hang up, he raises his hand in the air and slams it down onto the desk’s front edge. There’s a very wrong sound, and a sharp white pain, and he knows he has broken at least one bone.

In blinding pain, he rides his private elevator down into the opulent lobby, the beautiful redwood trim paid for by millions of people’s desire to live anywhere else but here. His eyes stream with tears and rage. But quietly, politely, to the terrified receptionist, he holds up his swollen, snapped claw, and says, “I’m going to have to get to the hospital.”

He knows what’s waiting for him there, after they mend his hand. They will scold him. They’ll put him on a drip and make him swear to eat properly. As the receptionist makes her frantic calls, Neelay glances up at the wall where he has hung those words of Borges, still the guiding principle of his young life:

Every man should be capable of all ideas, and I believe in the future he shall be.

Note to dear blog readers: Never ever let your mother have this kind of an effect on you. Or you may end up like poor Neelay here!

Stay tuned.

 

 

 

Global Fund for Women: Statement

NOTE: Lest you confuse this with Ivanka’s Global Women’s Initiative WHICH DOES NOTHING, the Global Fund for Women has existed in Menlo Park for decades, and provided small grants to women establishing their own businesses, from small villages in India and Africa, to women’s clinics, all over the world.

22 October 2019

No politician should come between a patient and their doctor, no matter what country they live in — but that’s exactly what the Trump administration has done. This is about health and rights — which transcend partisanship and borders.

One of Trump’s first actions as President was to reinstate the devastating global gag rule, which denies funding to international organizations working on global health if they provide abortion service or even referrals. This means that 26 million women and families worldwide are denied access to contraception, cancer screenings, STI treatment, and safe abortion services. And just last month, the same laws were expanded to the United States under Title X, which will prevent millions of women from being able to access affordable reproductive healthcare.

Global Fund for Women supports women’s rights organizations that are expanding legal and safe abortion access for women and girls, and funds feminist organizations that are documenting the impact of the global gag rule.

You can read more about this excellent organization, here.

Self Answered The Call

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And the results are out now.

Read. Read. Read.

Thank you forever, Lillian Howan, for soliciting a piece.

 

 

CALYX and the Nineteenth Amendment: Call for Submissions (Ends 31 July)

from Brenna Crotty, Senior Editor, Calyx:

Next year, in 2020, the United States will celebrate the centennial of the Nineteenth Amendment, and CALYX Press will turn forty-four years old. I don’t know if it’s a good or bad thing that Calyx has existed for nearly half the number of years that women have had the right to vote in this country, but “astonishing” seems like the right word for it either way.

In anticipation of the centennial, and in celebration of the labor and persistence that went into women’s suffrage, CALYX is open for a special extended submission period now through July 31, 2019. We are accepting poetry, fiction, and nonfiction on women’s participation in the political process, the myriad means through which women engage with and experience socio-political movements, and the ways full citizenship and access have been denied to different communities. Equal rights forwomen have had a long and fraught road, and our celebration of that first monumental victory in 1920 is tempered by the awareness that there is still so much progress to be made.

Dallas Cop Shoots Neighbor ‘By Accident’

Because the victim was black and was in his own apartment when the cop came in and shot him, there is nothing for it but to imagine the hashtag:

  • Being in your own apartment while black

Stay tuned.

What Has Happened to Oleg Sentsov?

In two years, Trump has arranged two of the most bizarre summits in the world:

  • with Kim Jong Un, a brutal dictator, who he made seem, according to The Economist (10 June 2018) “warm, jovial, and eminently reasonable.” The Economist maintains Kim Jong Un “ought to be at The Hague.”
  • with Putin in Helsinki, a “one-on-one” which offered Putin “the chance to be seen as a global statesman, an equal with the President of the United States, the leader of a country whose participation was needed to solve just about every pressing world problem.” (Joshua Yaffa in The New Yorker, 16 July 2018)

In the meantime, what has happened to Oleg Sentsov, who was jailed as a “terrorist” for “protesting against Vladimir Putin’s illegal annexation of Crimea and the war Russia’s president unleashed in eastern Ukraine four years ago” (The Economist, 10 June 2018)? No one knows. Here’s the latest article self found about him; it was almost a month ago, in The Guardian.

Trump instead calls for Russia to be allowed back into the G7, which expelled it “for the seizure of Crimea.” According to Trump, that “happened a while ago.”

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

Message from the National Democratic Redistricting Committee

  • The Supreme Court won’t fix gerrymandering soon, so it’s up to voters.

Charlotte Observer

Half of the officials who will take part in redistricting in 2021 will be elected this year, including governors who will have veto power over rigged maps.

This year, the National Democratic Committee is targeting:

  • 12 states
  • 10 governor’s races
  • 275 state legislative seats

Many of these elections are taking place in districts that are already gerrymandered, so Democrats are facing an uphill battle.

But the electoral fight IS winnable. It happened in Virginia and Wisconsin.

What do we want? We want “to see voters picking their politicians instead of politicians picking their voters.”

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

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