Call for Documentary Submissions: KQED ROUGH CUTS

Deadline: Wednesday, April 26

If you are editing a documentary that is over 40 minutes long and are seeking feedback, we encourage you to submit.

Principal photography should have been completed.

To submit your cut electronically, via Vimeo Plus or an equivalent video-sharing site, please fill out the on-line application.

To submit via mail, please contact Chris Holbrook at chrismholbrook@gmail.com

We will send you an application and an address where you can send your DVDs. (you will need to send three DVD copies, which must arrive by 5:00 p.m. Wednesday, April 26th)

There is a $25 submission fee.

Filmmakers who are selected for Rough Cuts are eligible for Fine Cuts and Assembly.

Stay tuned.

Tyrone Guthrie Art Centre: It IS Easy Being Green 2

JUST CELEBRATE A COLOR: GREEN!

— Michelle W., The Daily Post

Self went walking about the grounds today. Everywhere, there are drifts of yellow daffodils. The Laundry Room/ Greenhouse has a cozy porch.

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

It IS Easy Being Green! The Daily Post Photo Challenge, 22 March 2017

This week is all about color. For extra challenge, create a gallery.

— Michelle W., The Daily Post

  1. Justin Quinn’s poetry collection was published by Gallery Press (www.gallerypress.com)
  2. The sign was in the front window of Dog-Eared Books, Castro Street, San Francisco.
  3. The box was provided to me by Irish Express Moving Company, San Francisco. I used it to ship books I needed to Annaghmakerrig.

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

Atop It All

If you’re physically on top of a thing or place — a mountain, a skyscraper — what type of scene do you want to share in your frame?

— Cheri Lucas Rowlands, The Daily Post

For this week’s photo challenge, ATOP, self pulled from her Archive:

dscn9707

Fall 2016: Main Lobby of the de Young Museum in San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park: View from the 2nd Floor

DSCN9998

Summer 2016: The Tate Modern is housed in what used to be the Battersea Power Station. In keeping with its industrial spirit, everything in the Tate Modern has that utilitarian feel. Even the restaurant, on the 6th floor. It’s called The Kitchen. The Harry Potter Bridge (Formal Name: the Millenium Bridge) is to the right.

DSCN9647

Spring 2015: The Portrait Café, British National Portrait Gallery

Note to dear blog readers: The Portrait Cafe hosts an afternoon tea, which is booked weeks in advance. The day self showed up, early March, she could not get a seat. So if you would like to see this fabulous view while having tea, book in advance.

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

What the Writing Desk Looks Like Today, 20 March 2017

DSCN1136

Niall Leavy Brochure from a 2009 Exhibit Called “Inner Light”; copy of self’s book Mayor of the Roses: Stories, Miami University Press

Niall was here last year. Saw his work at Open Studio at the Tyrone Guthrie Centre.

At the opposite end of the table, self’s book from Miami University Press (There’s another story collection that came after this one: The Lost Language. Self’s Dearest Mum gave copies to all her friends as a Christmas present, but painstakingly tore out all the stories she didn’t like, lol)

You will notice that today the writing table is square. That’s because there are two of them in her unit, and she switches back and forth between them, depending on her need for the scissors, lol

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

Quote of the Day: Chapters, Dublin

Sometimes it might feel like we’re living in a bleak, alternate reality from the burned-out brain of a paranoid science fiction writer, but there’s always a world worse off than us.

Check out our favorite dystopian fiction in store.

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

Wish 2: Spring, Don’t Come Too Fast!

This week’s Daily Post Photo Challenge is WISH:

THIS WEEK, SHOW US A WISH

It was cold and windy today: fine, brisk, walking weather.

Self was captivated by these daffodils, springing up in bunches in front of the Main House in the Tyrone Guthrie Centre (The wind was blowing: you can see from the angle of the stems)

Spring can’t be far away. Which means warmer weather, longer days. Fabulous!

DSCN1081

Daffodils on the Slope In Front of the Main House, Tyrone Guthrie Centre, Annaghmakerrig

And yet, look at this picture she took in the early morning, two days ago: it’s only now she notices the filigree of the tree branches, silhouetted against the sky. So beautiful and delicate. When the leaves come back, this scene will be very different. So self feels conflicted: keeping winter’s bones might not be a bad thing! Especially when looking at trees!

If you look at this photograph with some detachment, doesn’t it look like an echocardiogram? Like the lines spit out of a defibrillator? Self means, the sharp up-and-down squiggles?

DSCN1054

The Lake at Annaghmakerrig, Early Morning

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

More of the Road Taken: London, March 2017

Today’s edition of The Road Taken is London.

Oh what a glorious morning. The sun is shining, the birds are chirping. Self enjoys looking out at the garden:

dscn0997

Bedford Place, London

Last night, self attended Evensong at St. Martin-in-the-Fields. The celebrant asked the congregation to pray for the United States, so that its leaders may have “consideration.” Afterwards, self headed toward Trafalgar Square:

dscn0988

Sunday Evening, Trafalgar Square

A few days ago, self met up with old friends Dodo and Helene (who grew up in the Philippines with her). They took her to see the minster at Beverley. We got to the town just before twilight, and the old stone of Beverley Minster seemed to glow:

dscn0931

Beverley Minster at Twilight

Travel lately has become extremely arduous, but it still gives self the purest joy.

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

Andrew O’Hehir on Salon.com

Thought-provoking piece in Saturday’s Salon.com by Andrew O’Hehir in which he tries to parse how much of the blame for the Trump debacle rests on the media themselves, or on the distortion created by reliance on social media.

Since self is sure she is the only person in the world dealing with her excoriating disappointment over the U.S. political process while reading a book about a 1755 U.S. political crisis, let’s just say her opinions are probably based on comparisons between 1755 America and now.

And what self has concluded is that Trump reminds her of the English Prime Minister in 1755, the Duke of ______ (It was several hundred pages back; self will look up the name in a bit), who was endlessly campaigning, even when he had already won, and who was so quickly bored with the responsibilities of his position that he went to war and cared not a whit about sending suitable men and material with which to execute this war, and thus many people died on the American frontier, without gaining the English any political advantage (that English officer class, though — “Ours but to do or die” to the last!) — not that the Duke/Prime Minister cared all that much. After all, it’s not as if anyone expected him to pick up a musket! What a horrible, disagreeable, rude idea!

On to O’Hehir’s piece:

Quoting Samuel Greene of King’s College London by way of Thomas B. Edsall of The New York Times: “Our information landscape is open and fluid . . . voters’ perceptions have become untethered from reality. Thus, the news we consume has become as much about emotion and identity as about facts.”

Can you blame us? We’re stuck reading POTUS tweets every single day. Every single one of those tweets comes at us from an emotional angle. Granted, they all have the same emotional tone: that of a needy five-year-old. We’re so fascinated we can’t look away. Come on, media: even you must admit you’ve been hypnotized by posts that say SAD and BIGLY and YUUUGE. And if you professional journalists can’t resist this tsunami of unfettered emotion coming from POTUS, how do you expect us to?

O’Hehir on Fake News and how we got here: “In a universe shaped by the blatant untruths and racist fantasies of right-wing media, where Barack Obama’s birthplace was a mystery, the Sandy Hook shootings might have been staged and millions of people who were not obviously suffering from severe mental illness took the Pizzagate scandal seriously, the difference between news and fake news comes to seem like a matter of taste or opinion.”

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

John Wick, Chapter 2: Keanu, Self Will Always Love You

Have you ever walked out of a film so struck by awe and wonder your skin is abuzz? Has a film ever left you so joyful and drunk on adrenaline that it made you more hopeful about the world? Has a lead performance in an action film ever had such balletic grace it made you marvel at the possibilities of the human body itself? This is exactly how I felt watching John Wick: Chapter Two, the sequel to the surprising 2014 action hit.

— Angelica Jade Bastien, rogerebert.com

« Older entries