Quest: Daily Post Photo Challenge, 23 September 2016

We have a new Daily Post Photo Challenge, dropped today by Cheri Lucas Rowlands, QUEST:

  • What are you in search for? Capture your quest with your camera.

Here are some photos from self’s (huge) stash of photos that she thinks emblemize QUEST:

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An Ed Ruscha: Currently on Exhibit at the De Young Museum

And here’s from a handmade book self saw at the Legion of Honor:

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Illustrated Book at the Legion of Honor, Text is by San Francisco Poet Wallace Ting

Every new story is a quest. Here are two pages of her draft for “Ice” (forthcoming from Bellingham Review):

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Two Pages of Self’s Manuscript for “Ice,” One of Her Dystopian Fantasies

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

 

Edgy de Young Museum

Several weeks ago, self spent a day at the de Young, to see an Ed Ruscha exhibit.

My goodness, it was amazing.

She took a break for coffee in the sculpture garden. Here’s the pedestrian walkway over the café’s outdoor seating. VERY edgy:

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Pedestrian Walkway, de Young Museum, Golden Gate Park

Entrance lobby of the de Young: Everything is edgy.

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Looking down at the Main Lobby from the second floor: You really see edges!

Finally, an “End” is an EDGE. Of sorts:

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Ed Ruscha’s “The End,” Viewed in the de Young Museum in Golden Gate Park, August 2016

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

Mirror: The Daily Post Photo Challenge, 2 September 2016

  • This week’s challenge is all about reflections.

— Jen H., The Daily Post

Here is self’s first take:

Noelle Q. de Jesus reading from her first short story collection, Blood, at the San Francisco Main Library, 100 Larkin Street, 23 August 2016:

(The table is a reflective surface)

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Noelle Q. de Jesus (in red and black top) and Edwin Lozada, who organized the reading: August 23, 2016, San Francisco Main Library

A man is reflected in an Ed Ruscha work at the de Young Museum in San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park, about a month ago:

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An Ed Ruscha at the de Young Museum, August 2016

Final photo: the sculpture garden at the de Young Museum, August 2016. That refective ball is pretty fabulous!

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Sculpture Garden, outside the de Young Museum in Golden Gate Park, August 2016

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

Narrow: The Daily Post Photo Challenge, 29 Friday 2016

  • From spaghetti to the quiet alley behind your house, this week show us something narrow.

—  Ben Huberman, The Daily Post

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Manhattan, June 2016

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In Manhattan, the Avenues are narrow canyons between buildings: Park Avenue, June 2016

For a change of scene, Oxford, UK had an exhibit on “Shakespeare’s Dead.” Self was there in May 2016. The banner advertising the exhibit is pretty narrow:

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An exhibit at the Bodleian Libraries, Oxford, UK: May 2016

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

 

Details 2: Spring and Summer 2016

Discover the intimate details of something unexpected.

— Jen H., The Daily Post

Self’s go-to summer sandal: low heel, super-comfy, and bright orange. Summer’s all about comfort and freedom: her feet are happy.

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This is New York City, May 2016, during an unexpected lull in a frantic week:

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Park Avenue Nocturne: Self only just noticed the little squares of lighted windows from the buildings across the street. The view is from her brother-in-law’s apartment in Manhattan.

Finally, self was able to visit Bletchley Park, just outside London, in early June. It was an overcast day, self got to the park early, before the crowds arrived. In fact, self was the only person walking from the train station that morning.

She hasn’t seen The Imitation Game, the movie about the codebreakers of Bletchley Park, but there’s an exhibit of costumes used during the filming, and Benedict Cumberbatch is on the audio guide.

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Whatever self expected when she visited Bletchley Park in June, she never expected the grounds to be so lovely. There was a lake full of ducks and very approachable swans.

Highly recommend a visit to Bletchley Park. The exhibits include an actual Enigma machine. The history is just palpable.

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

Pure 2: New York and London

  • “I love finding beauty in the mundane, and purity in the midst of our chaotic, over-connected world.”

— Jen H., Daily Post Photo Challenge (Theme: PURE)

Examples: a city-scape; a museum

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New York skyline, June 2016: The “purity” of early morning, the day not yet begun

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Classical Elegance: The British Museum, early June 2016

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Classical Elegance, The British Museum, June 2016

New York looks peaceful in the early morning light.

The venerable British Museum opened up its interior with classically simple lines.

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

Numbers 4: Exhibits, Museum of the History of Science (Oxford) and the British Museum

Self-explanatory!

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Oxford, England: May 2016

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Assyrian Gallery, British Museum, London: May 2016

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Another Caption from the Assyrian Gallery in the British Museum: May 2016

Numbers 3: More From Bletchley Park

Each building in Bletchley Park has specific displays and documentary films. In the codebreaking huts (a total of 11, self thinks there were), the lighting is purposefully dim, as if to give the impression of how much secrecy was involved.

Yet the grounds themselves are beautiful.

Self never got to see the Benedict Cumberbatch movie, The Imitation Game. The film has a special exhibit in the Mansion House — there’s very interesting information from the costume designer, about the thinking behind the way the actors — who played a constellation of codebreakers that included Alan Turing and Stuart Menzies — were dressed.

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

Numbers 2: Bletchley Park

Since this week’s Daily Post Photo Challenge is NUMBERS, that’s all self could think of when she was in Bletchley Park, today.

The grounds are very beautiful. Self was so glad she decided to go.

Since she comes from Silicon Valley, she was most interested in checking out the claim that the world’s first electronic computer (Ahem!) was built on-site by Alan Turing’s team (And to think, all these years, self thought the first computer was made by IBM!)

Approximately 9,000 people worked here toward the end of World War II. All of them left the premises, the day after Germany made its official announcement of unconditional surrender. The documents were shredded, the machines dismantled, and the huts torn down. But the Bletchley Park Foundation has done a superb job at recreating the offices.

It’s only an hour away from London by train.

Self saw two Enigma machines and a fragment of a Colossus.

As well as tons of World War II memorabilia. One small cabinet in the Main House contains a series of memos, one dated December 1941 saying that Bletchley’s request for more material to build code-breaking machines had been denied. Right next to it is a message that came straight from the “Prime Minister’s Office” and was signed by Winston Churchill, May 1942. It’s only two sentences, the gist being: “Whatever they need, give it to them.”

Self imagined it would be inundated by people on a Saturday. But it wasn’t.

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

Spare 4: Tate Modern, Banksea

On the fourth floor of the Tate is a huge neon sign:

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Tate Modern, 4th Floor

What self loves about the Tate Modern is that it captures the essence of the old Battersea Power Station, keeping the cavernous spaces and giving them a very industrial feel.

Here’s an installation by Magdalena Abakanowicz. It consists of cocoon-like objects wrapped in burlap. Self neglected to write down the name of the work, alas! The caption says the artist’s work reflects “her interest in biological systems.”

To self’s way of thinking, SPARE is not the same thing as “sparse.”

Not even a little bit.

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

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