Translation: Domenico Adriano, transl. by Barbara Carle

Perhaps because within myself
I had already chosen your portrait
here they are in fields of thought
one thousand and a thousand more red poppies

— Domenico Adriano, excerpt from Da Papaveri Perversi, translated from the Italian by Barbara Carle

#amreadingpoetry: Liu Xia

Before you go into the grave
Don’t forget to write to me with your ashes
Don’t forget to leave your underworld address

quoted by Liao Yiwu in his introduction to Liu Xia’s collection Empty Chairs, the bilingual edition (Graywolf Press)

Book # 8: Unit # 1, Tyrone Guthrie Centre

DSCN1429

The Lives of the Fathers, Martyrs and Other Principal Saints by the Rev. Alan Butler, Volume II

The publisher: Virtue & Co., Ltd.

The saints are grouped by month. For example, April includes five Popes (Anicetus, Leo IX, Soter, Cletus, and Marcellinus), three Abbots (Stephen, Beuno, and Robert), and three Archbishops (Elpheg, Anselm, and Mellitus).

June has two Queens (Clotilda, Queen of France and Margaret, Queen of Scotland), one King (Ladislas I of Hungary) and 4 Apostles (Barnabas, Boniface Apostle of Russia, Peter and Paul).

It is amazing how few women there are. Aside from the Queens, there are three Virgins and two Widows.

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

The Fine Calibration of Favors: RUBICON, p. 140

There was a rich guy named Crassus and he just wanted to be Caesar, okay?

He was sort of a skinflint.

Reading Tom Holland’s Rubicon, self is reminded that only stupid people never grant any favors. People who refuse categorically to grant any favors are not only stupid, they’re thinking strictly short-term. The granting of favors pays off big time in the future. It’s called leverage.

Back to the reading for the day:

p. 140:

Crassus knew a Greek philosopher, Alexander, who occasionally came over to stay (Holland says the hospitality Crassus extended was “grudging”). Alexander “would be lent a cloak for journeys then required to give it back.” (No mention by Holland of how many times Alexander borrowed a cloak; after the first time, it would seem only natural for Alexander to provide himself with his own cloak: but no. Perhaps he was just as much of a skinflint as Crassus. And this guy was a philosopher).

Alexander was “Greek, and therefore did not have the vote. Had he been a citizen, then he would have been encouraged to borrow far more than a cloak. The more eminent his status, the more spectaculary he would have been encouraged to fall into debt.”

#Nice #pointsTomHolland

Tom Holland, RUBICON, p. 120

We learn about the importance of outward appearance in Rubicon, p. 120:

Julius Caesar was forced to flee Rome because of a power struggle in which he ended up on the wrong side, saved from assassination only by his mother’s family ties to some of Rome’s richest and wealthiest.

While in Rome, young Caesar raised eyebrows when he wore “his belt too loosely. In the courts of Eastern kings, however, stylish dressers were much admired, and the provincial authorities were quick to realise that the patrician dandy would be ideally cut out for diplomatic missions. Caesar was accordingly dispatched to Nicomedes, the King of Bithynia — who was indeed charmed by his Roman guest. Too charmed . . .  Nicomedes was believed to have demonstrated his appreciation of Caesar by taking him as a lover.”

By the time Julius Caesar returned to Rome, “not only had he” managed to keep “Nicomedes sweet . . . he had managed to borrow much of Nicomedes’ fleet.”

Those Romans, though! #SMH

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

#amreadingpoetry: Justin Quinn

Flood-Plains

There are rushes and loess
round trees in all the boskets
worked into large brown baskets
with care and quick finesse

by the swirling grand excess
that charged down from the Beskyds.
The baked mud breaks like biscuits
beneath the emptiness.

I’ll marry thee
with a rush ring then
and faithfull be

till that moist sliver
rises agayne
to a raging river.

— Justin Quinn, from his collection Waves and Trees (The Gallery Press, Ireland)

More Density in Annaghmakerrig

Self loves looking at things up close. Very, very up close.

But she also loves looking for patterns.

And she also works (in her writing) through layering, which is more the way a visual artist works.

And this week, in Annaghmakerrig (more specifically, the Tyrone Guthrie Centre), she found many, many opportunities to elaborate on The Daily Post Photo Challenge this week, DENSE:

Pillows and bedcovers:

DSCN1367

Pillow and Blanket: Self loves the saturation of color. Also, she’s never seen a white so blinding as it is here in Annaghmakerrig.

More trees! This shot self took yesterday evening. It had rained all day. Suddenly, around 7 p.m., sun!

DSCN1375

Annaghmakerrig, After a Day of Constant Rain

DSCN1329

Bernadette Burns: Whether it’s because she lives on an island (off Skibbereen, West Cork) and self’s father came from an island (in the Philippines), self saw so many affinities with her work. Look at the dark boat, floating on an ethereal sea. The boat looks amazingly DENSE, yet it floats.

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

The Body Is a Boat

DSCN1345

Bernadette Burns: Artist from Skibbereen, West Cork


The body is a boat that carries the soul in the ocean of the world.  If it is not strong, or it has a hole, then it cannot cross the ocean, so the first duty is to fix the boat.

— Baba Hari Dass

Dense 4: More Annaghmakerrig

So lucky to be here at the Tyrone Guthrie Centre. Every day feels like a gift.

And happy that self can post so many pictures for this week’s Photo Challenge: DENSE.

The Artists’ Studios, Early Morning:

DSCN1346

Last night, self went over to the studio of one of the visual artists, Bernadette Burns. Her work is “in progress.” Love that you can actually see the energy of the brush stroke. Her medium is oil:

DSCN1338

Bernadette Burns, Work in Progress: Photographed Last Night in Studio # 1

Here’s a sketch that Bernadete did “for fun”:

DSCN1335

Bernadette Burns: Pencil Drawing

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

pp. 398 – 399, Mary Beard

TRIGGER WARNING: Because some of those Roman Emperors #selfshakesherhead were clearly cray-cray.

The Emperor Commodus “dressed as a gladiator and” threatened “the senators in the front-row seats of the Colosseum by waving the head of a decapitated ostrich at them” (An eyewitness “had to pluck some laurel leaves from the wreath he was wearing and stuff them in his mouth to stifle the giggles.”)

Tiberius retired from public life almost entirely, preferring to stay in his villa on Capri where he used “little fishes” (euphemism for “boys”) to nibble at his _________ underwater. (There is a film re-enactment in Bob Guccione’s 1970s Caligula)

Mary Beard says the following is “even more chilling” than Tiberius or Commodus: Domitian would torture “flies by killing them with his pen.”

#what #Sorrybutno #youcannotbeserious #whocaresaboutflies

She derides Marcus Aurelius for being cliché: “Do not act as if you were going to live 10,000 years. Death hangs over you.”

Vespasian (69 CE) put “a tax on human urine.”

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

« Older entries

Sauce Box

Running my sauce box about my humorous human encounters and probably some other stuff. Enjoy!

GK Dutta

Be One... Make One...

Cee's Photography

Learning and teaching the art of composition.

fashionnotfear.wordpress.com/

Fear holds you back, fashion takes you places!

Wanderlust and Wonderment

My writing and photo journey of inspiration and discovery

transcribingmemory

Decades of her words.

John Oliver Mason

Observations about my life and the world around me.

Insanity at its best!

Yousuf Bawany's Blog

litadoolan

Any old world uncovered by new writing

unbolt me

the literary asylum

the contemporary small press

A site for small presses, writers, poets & readers

The 100 Greatest Books Challenge

A journey from one end of the bookshelf to the other

Random Storyteller

"Stories makes us more alive, more human. . . . "---Madeleine L'Engle

Rants Of A Gypsy

Amuse Thyself Reader!

FashionPoetry By Val

Fashion. Poetry. Music. Travel. Food. Growth.

Kanlaon

Just another Wordpress.com weblog

Jean Lee's World

Finder of Fantasy & Adventure in Her Own Backyard