More Rule of Thirds: Elk, California

The prompt: “Focus closely on your subject and use a wide aperture.”

The View From Elk, CA

The View From Elk, CA

More of Elk, California

More of Elk, California

And still more of Elk, California

And still more of Elk, California

Symmetry 3: WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge

This week’s WordPress Photo Challenge is Symmetry.

So, here are some examples of symmetry (which, for the purposes of this post, will include repetition):

Is this not a very very fine lunch? Yesterday, on the way back to Mendocino.

Is this not a very very fine lunch? Yesterday, on the way back to Mendocino.

The symmetrical hills! This is from Navarro Winery on Route 128.

The symmetrical hills! This is from Navarro Winery on Route 128.

The Navarro Winery's most famous product is its Gewurztraminer.

The Navarro Winery’s most famous product is its Gewurztraminer. Someone told her that.

Sorry for the third picture being a tad repetitious, but believe it or not it was snapped at a different moment, so it has its own unique identity.

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

Symmetry 2: WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge

Symmetry (noun): the quality of something that has two sides or halves that are the same or very close in size, shape and position; the quality of having symmetrical parts.

California Route 128 West, near Navarro

California Route 128 West, near Navarro

Route 128: This looks like more of the same shot, but self assures you it isn't.

Route 128: This looks like more of the same shot, but self assures you it isn’t.

Last Shot (At this point, dear blog readers may well be saying to one another, Hurrah) of Route 128 West near Navarro

Last Shot (At this point, dear blog readers may well be saying to one another, Hurrah) of Route 128 West near Navarro

Those trees are magnificent, aren’t they? Self remembers reading somewhere that the oldest living thing on Earth is a sequoia tree which is in Sequoia National Park. It has survived — OK, self will live for danger — 1,000 years, at least. Self thinks.

Stay tuned.

 

Heartbreaking: Colm Toibin

Self is just a few pages from the end of Brooklyn.  This is truly a great novel. Self’s heart aches for Eilis, the young Irish woman whose story this is.

SPOILER ALERT

She’s emigrated to New York but returns to Ireland for the funeral of her sister, who died suddenly of a heart condition. Apparently, the world is such a small place. Her doings in Brooklyn have already circulated in the Irish town she is from, chief among which is the fact that she’s begun dating an Italian American.

“Oh, don’t try and fool me!” Miss Kelly said. “You can fool most people, but you can’t fool me.”

“I am sure I would not like to fool anyone,” Eilis said.

“Is that right, Miss Lacey? If that’s what your name is now.

“What do you mean?”

“She told me the whole thing. The world, as the man says, is a very small place.”

Eilis, who up to then had been vaccilating about whether to return to New York, and who was starting to see a local man, immediately books passage and starts packing (and in the meantime, self’s heart is breaking into a million little pieces).

A few times after the hours that followed she was tempted to carry up a tray with tea and biscuits or sandwiches to her mother; her mother’s door remained closed and there was not a sound from the room.

Apparently, Eilis’s mother, too, had heard.

Naturally, Eilis is shunned by everyone.  Self quite understands why Eilis can no longer stay in Ireland, but feels terrible on her behalf.

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

 

A Terrible Thing Happened to Self Yesterday

A terrible thing happened to self yesterday: she and two friends were in Elk, standing just behind The Griffin House, looking down at the wild, crashing Pacific. And it was so horrendous and heart-stopping, the view. It was sunset. The sun was sending rays of light through cracks and fissures in the monolithic cliffs. And her camera just up and died. Died! Died! Died!

Bunny said to her: “You are the only person who would have a camera when you can just take pictures with your cell phone!” And she had no answer. Absolutely none. He said that about two hours earlier. Good thing he said that, because at this moment of extreme dismay, self remembered that she did have a cell phone, and she whipped it out and took a couple of (very bad) pictures. Which, never fear, she will not inflict on dear blog readers. At least, not right now.

Instead, she will share some pretty fantastic links — to WordPress bloggers whose takes on this week’s theme, DEPTH, were just, in self’s humble opinion, awe-inspiring:

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

 

The Versatile Blogger Award!

This blog was nominated for The Versatile Blogger Award, thanks to Mélange of Musings.

Thanks much! Very honored.

The Rules for The Versatile Blogger Award:

Show the Read the rest of this entry »

Still Reading Carrie Ryan’s “After the Cure”

It was a beautiful day in Mendocino. The sun was shining. It was warm.

Self had lunch out, at a small deli just a block away.

She was reading about Read the rest of this entry »

Express Yourself 2: More Art!

Pavlos Mayakis, Fiber Artist, teaches classes at the Mendocino Art Center.

Pavlos Mayakis, Fiber Artist, teaches classes at the Mendocino Art Center.

Artist Janet Self, standing next to her piece in the 2nd floor of Odd Fellows Hall's art gallery

Artist Janet Self, standing next to her piece in the 2nd floor of Odd Fellows Hall’s art gallery

Love this mobile! This, as well as the pieces hanging on the walls, are paper maché pieces created by elementary school children in the Mendocino County public schools.

Love this mobile! This, as well as the pieces hanging on the walls, are paper maché pieces created by elementary school children in the Mendocino County public schools: 1st Floor, Odd Fellows Hall Gallery, Mendocino

WARM BODIES Redux: Carrie Ryan’s “After the Cure” (In AFTER: NINETEEN STORIES OF APOCALYPSE AND DYSTOPIA)

from Carrie Ryan’s story, “After the Cure,” in After: Nineteen Stories of Apocalypse and Dystopia, edited by Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling:

An ex-vampire reflects:

In that moment I wasn’t sure where the monster ended and where I began. I know the government just wanted me to go back to the life I’d lived before, but the monster always stretched under my skin as a memory. My nails always a little thicker than before, my hair a little thinner. The taste of animal meat never enough as it used to be.

I wondered why they even bothered curing us.

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

 

Self Does Love a Good Poem

This one’s from Eunoia Review:

The author is Anthony Tao, whose poetry has appeared or is forthcoming in Kartika Review, Borderlands, Texas Poetry Review, Prairie Schooner, and the Anthill.

An Excerpt from “Chinese Love Song”:

She is quick to giggle, riddled
with unsanswered questions:

is it he, him, his character?
His whiteness,

white for privilege
and power? Or that inside

he quivers?
She giggles, forgetting

her mother had said
giggling was unseemly

for such an ugly girl –

You can read the rest of the poem here, dear blog readers.

Stay tuned.

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