2nd ‘Alice in Wonderland’ Quote of the Day

If I meant that, I’d have said it.

— Humpty Dumpty to Alice in Alice in Wonderland, Chapter VI (“Humpty Dumpty”)

Quote of the Day: Lewis Carroll

“You alarm me!” said the King. “I feel faint — give me a ham sandwich!”

On which the messenger, to Alice’s great amusement, opened a bag that hung round his neck, and handed a sandwich to the King, who devoured it greedily.

“Another sandwich!” said the King.

Alice in Wonderland, Chapter VII (“The Lion and the Unicorn”)

Too Funny! More Anne Enright

  • It was very ageing — fat. It made her daughter look like an old woman, which was a kind of insult, after all the care that was put into the rearing of her. The coat didn’t help. It was like an anorak, almost.

The Green Road, p. 160

Details: Summer Garb, So On Fleek, July 2016

I love the exotic and the mundane, the wondrous and the earthy.

—  Jen H., The Daily Post

This month is the height of summer.

Summer is self’s favorite season.

It is hot, and the corn and watermelon are sweet.

Garb is: Anything Goes.

For self’s first post on The Daily Post’s Photo Challenge this week — DETAILS — she decided to share pictures of clothing that caught her eye at various outdoor events this month:

(1) At the Calgary Stampede, held every July in fabulous Calgary, Alberta: A young Mom rocks the pink cowboy boots and the gold tote bag combo!

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(2)  A couple crossing the intersection of Jefferson and Middlefield in downtown Redwood City during a lull in the annual Redwood City Fourth of July Parade are rockin’ the Stars and Stripes! You can only pull this kind of look off in July. Otherwise, you just look cheesy!

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3)  Finally, another Stars’n Stripes outfit from the 2016 Redwood City Fourth of July parade:

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Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

Thought For the Day

Spotted in the Model Home Exhibit at the Calgary Stampede:

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Nice, right?

Stay tuned.

Lookup 2: Calgary Stampede

Self wasn’t kidding when she vowed last year to return to Calgary for the Calgary Stampede.

As it turns out, this week’s Daily Post Photo Challenge — LOOK UP — gave her many opportunities to get a little more creative with her shots as she walked around with her cousins Mike and Pixie.

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Gotta love those emoji pillows!

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

Throne of Glass: The ‘Katniss’ Affect

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Karina reads! She introduced self to The Infernal Devices, by Cassandra Clare, Spring 2015.

Niece’s latest book recommendation is Sarah J. Maas’s Throne of Glass. It’s about a female assassin who, as the book opens, is stuck working as a slave in a salt mine.

If you’d like to know how she ended up there, read the book. She gets a surprise when, one day, she is taken to meet the Crown Prince.

Assasin’s name is Calaena. She refuses to bow, naturally. Which means someone grabs her by the back of the neck and forces her face down to the floor (Don’t worry, she’s not an egg; she won’t crack)

. . .  she’d been trained to be an assassin since the age of eight, since the day the King of the Assassins found her half-dead on the banks of a frozen river and brought her to his keep. She wouldn’t be humiliated by anything, least of all being dirty.

Throne of Glass, p. 8

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

THE GIRL ON THE TRAIN: Train of Thought

Self wants it to NOT be Rachel.

Because Rachel evokes so many feelz in self.

And Rachel’s point of view is the one we’re inside of, mostly.

Somewhere near the halfway point of Girl on the Train, self reads an Anna point of view. Self is usually impatient with multiple point of view narratives: she thinks the switching around is really just a lame excuse for the author not to come up with a tight plot. Like the switch is nothing more than an extended tease. But self really relishes the point-of-view switches in Girl on the Train. The novel presents us with a great puzzle and a great unreliable narrator and the only way the reader can figure out what’s really going down is to hear from all the characters.

Anna (Tom’s current wife) describes seeing Rachel. It’s a scene that we’ve seen earlier, narrated from Rachel’s point of view. All along, self has thought of Rachel as a well-meaning, deluded drunk. Just your typical messed-up anti-heroine. Self absolutely loathes Tom. His diatribes, his abandonment of Rachel. Of course, we aren’t that sympathetic with Anna, Tom’s current wife.

Then, suddenly, we’re inside Anna’s head, Anna watching Rachel. And it is a little un-nerving to read Rachel as giving a sort of sneer at Anna. The sneer of a woman who is absolutely in control of her actions, if not of her emotions. Could Rachel be pulling a fast one on the reader? (And how on earth is Emily Blunt going to play this character, Emily Blunt who is so immensely likeable even when bitchy, as she was in The Devil Wears Prada?)

What’s really interesting is that, despite the fact that Anna is the Other Woman, and of course we would not expect her to have a sympathetic view of Rachel, when she describes sneering Rachel, it makes the reader question her liking of Rachel, instead of making us dislike Anna more.

Why does this happen?

Each switch in point of view is a surprise. In other words, the patterns are unpredictable: we don’t have a uniform order for the switching. It’s not Anna, followed by Rachel, followed by Megan, then back to Anna, followed by Rachel, followed by Megan etc etc

But each switch does carry the story forward. And readers find themselves becoming detectives, constantly testing new theories of who did what.

And such is self’s curiosity that she sometimes cannot wait to resume reading, she grabs the book (which is always in her tote) even if it only means reading a few paragraphs more.

She thinks her seatmate on the plane who much preferred Daniel Silva to Paula Hawkins was so, so wrong.

The Girl on the Train resembles The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime, another mystery that asks: Who did it?

The central character has some flaw that makes it difficult for her/him to be taken seriously. In TCIOTDITN, it’s the narrator’s Aspergers. Here, it’s the fact that Rachel is alcoholic and depressed and given to mood swings. Yet, they doggedly persist in their “investigations.”

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

New Adds to Reading List

  • The Course of Love, a novel by Alain de Botton
  • Sons and Daughters of Ease and Plenty, a novel by Ramona Ausubel
  • Swimming Studies, a memoir by Leanne Shapton

BLUE Again: Sylvain Landry – Week 47 Challenge

This is the first time self has ever posted twice to a Sylvain Landry weekly prompt.

YAY! Things must be looking up!

The theme this week is BLUE.

Self stayed in brother-in-law’s apartment in New York. She ordered out for food and spent a lot of time looking out the windows. Her nephew, Chris, was in and out. It was nice to know she was not alone.

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One night, from one of brother-in-law’s living room windows, self peeked out and saw a sliver of moon. She thought: That might make a nice picture.

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

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