Sir Walter Elliott!

Persuasion, p. 213:

  • Morning visits are never fair by women at her time of life, who make themselves up so little. If she would only wear rouge, she would not be afraid of being seen; but last time I called, I observed the blinds were down immediately.

Stay tuned.

Elizabeth Elliott: PERSUASION, p. 212

Self is so energetically barreling on with Persuasion! This is the fastest she’s read any Jane Austen! Last year, Emma took her forever. But Mr. Knightley made up for it.

  • Oh! You may as well take back that tiresome book she would lend me, and pretend I have read it through. I really cannot be plaguing myself for ever with all the new poems and states of the nation that come out. Lady Russell quite bores me with her new publications. You need not tell her so, but I thought her dress hideous the other night. I used to think she had some taste in dress, but I was ashamed of her at the concert. Something so formal and arrangé in her air! and she sits so upright! My best love, of course.

lol

lol

lol

Stay tuned.

Sir Walter Elliott: PERSUASION, p. 139

“How is Mary looking?” said Sir Walter, in the height of his good humor. “The last time I saw her, she had a red nose, but I hope that may not happen every day.”

Jane Austen Sentence of the Day!

Persuasion, p. 105:

  • Their conversation, the preceding evening, did not disincline him to seek her again.

Wowoweeee, things certainly looking up for Anne Elliott! Her every word and every gesture being registered by not only disingenuous Captain Frederick Wentworth, but every member of the walking party in Lyme Regis!

Stay tuned.

 

PERSUASION: p. 103

A servant answers a question posed to him by Captain Wentworth: “Mr. Elliott, a gentleman of large fortune . . . ”

Which probably gives Captain Wentworth pause.

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

Comedy of Manners

Persuasion, p. 39:

  • The Musgroves, like their houses, were in a state of alteration, perhaps of improvement. The father and mother were in the old English style, and the young people in the new. Mr. and Mrs. Musgrove were a very good sort of people; friendly and hospitable, not much educated, and not at all elegant.

Mrs. Clay: PERSUASION, p. 20

“We are not all born to be handsome. The sea is no beautifier, certainly; sailors do grow old betimes; I have often observed it; they soon lose the look of youth. But then, is it not the same with many other professions, perhaps most other? Soldiers, in active service, are not at all better off: and even in the quieter professions, there is a toil and a labour of the mind, if not of the body, which seldom leave a man’s looks to the natural effect of time. The lawyer plods, quite care-worn; the physician is up at all hours, and traveling in all weather; and even the clergyman –” She stopt a moment to consider what might do for the clergyman; — “and even the clergyman, you know, is obliged to go into infected rooms, and expose his health and looks to all the injury of a poisonous atmosphere. In fact, as I have long been convinced, though every profession is necessary and honourable in its turn, it is only the lot of those who are not obliged to follow any, who can live in a regular way, in the country, choosing their own hours, following their own pursuits, and living on their own property, without the torment of trying for more; it is only their lot, I say, to hold the blessings of health and a good appearance to the utmost: I know no other set of men but what lose something of their personableness when they cease to be quite young.”

Self is so very, very, very glad to be reading a novel again.

Stay tuned.

Mr. Knightley: EMMA, Vol. II

Reading Emma has been hard going: there’s not a page that self doesn’t have to re-read (sentences so long!). Now, however, she’s developing quite an interest in the character of Mr. Knightley.

Emma’s sister, Isabella, is married to his brother John, making “Mr. Knightley” Emma’s brother-in-law. Mr. Knightley is 16 years older than Emma, and his presence in her life is that of benign older brother (It is a little hard for self to wrap her mind around Mr. Knightley as a romantic partner for Emma. If for nothing else than that humongous age gap!).

Emma and Mr. Knightley had their little tiffs in Vol. I, but he doesn’t remain angry at her and by the end of Vol. I they are on speaking terms again.

In Vol. II, with the appearance of a “stranger” — Frank Churchill — into Emma’s little world of Highbury, Mr. Knightley (he is never anything other than “Mr. Knightley” to Emma) suddenly appears in opposition:

  • There was one person among his new acquaintance in Surry, not so leniently disposed. In general he was judged, throughout the parishes of Donwell and Highbury, with great candour; liberal allowances were made for the little excesses of such a handsome young man — one who smiled so often and bowed so well; but there was one spirit among them not to be softened, from its power of censure, by bows or smiles — Mr. Knightley . . .  for the moment he was silent; but Emma heard him almost immediately afterwards say to himself, over a newspaper he held in his hand, “Hum! just the trifling, silly fellow I took him for.’ She had half a mind to resent; but an instant’s observation convinced her that it was really said only to relieve his own true feelings; and not meant to provoke; and therefore she let it pass.

Self can hardly wait for Mr. Knightley, Emma, and Frank Churchill to begin quarreling with each other!

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

Sentence of the Day: Sian Cain, The Guardian

As an antidote to the extremely respectful commentary The Economist has been according POTUS (which drives self crazy, she just might discontinue her subscription), here is The Guardian which really knows how to do satire:

The nicest thing anyone can say about US Vice President Mike Pence — a man who vigorously opposed marriage inequality and looks like an Action Man assembled from Play-Doh and cold cuts — is that he knows how to name a pet.

— from Vice-President Mike Pence disappears down the rabbit hole, by The Guardian’s Sian Cain, 20 March 2018

THE MANDIBLES: A FAMILY, 2029 – 2047, p. 262

Gosh, self loves this book now. She’s going to have to up her Goodreads rating for it. She initially gave it two stars, then upped it to three. But, on the basis of what she’s read thus far, she’ll up it another star: to four.

The novel follows each member of the Mandibles family as they deal with being broke and unattractive (Being broke is a far different condition than being poor: being poor is a situation you can’t always help; being broke is absolutely the result of mis-calculation or hubris or something, and there’s a lot of blame involved) in a not-so-distant future (2029, it says so right in the title)

HOW AVERY DEALS, p. 262:

For the better part of the last year, Avery had taken refuge in toil: scrubbing, dishwashing, mending, chopping and laundry . . .  Swallowing her umbrage, she coached Goog on his Spanish. She only panicked when she ran out of tasks. Drudgery was therapeutic. Were she ever to start another practice, she’d have all her patients mop the floor.

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

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