Against the Odds: The Daily Post Photo Challenge, 15 February 2017

An unexpected victory? A snapshot of an unlikely moment? This week, show us something that defines the odds.

— Michelle W., The Daily Post

Last year, on the 2nd day of self’s trip to the UK, her camera shutter stopped opening all the way. Rather than buy a new camera, self decided to see how far she could push that old thing. And it lasted till the very end of her trip.

One of the last places she visited before returning home was Bletchley Park, about an hour train ride from London. Bletchley Park is where the World War II codebreakers did their work. According to the visitors’ brochure, “the Codebreakers’ efforts helped to shorten the war by up to two years, saving countless lives.” The codebreakers worked year-round in unheated wooden huts. “The first Enigma ciphers were broken in early 1940.”

bletchleyparkjune2016

Bletchley Park: June 2016

Self took the picture below in Chinatown. She forgets which street it was on. It was either on Grant or on Stockton. Look closer at the words, and it turns out to be about Filipino immigration: the first immigrants faced discrimination. Caucasian women were not allowed to marry Asian immigrants, most of whom were single men. Yet, those early immigrants endured. Their descendants are all over California.

chinatownmural

Wall Mural, Chinatown, San Francisco

Anne-Adele Wight coordinates a monthly reading series at Head House Books in Philadelphia. She is a published poet. Just before June’s event, she hurt her knee and had to wear a brace. But — the show must go on!

She is fantastic.

dscn0163

Anne-Adele Wight introducing speakers at the Head House reading series, which she coordinates: Philadelphia, June 2016

So there are self’s examples of “Against the Odds,” which is a very, very interesting photo challenge.

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

2nd Sentence of the Day: AMERICAN GODS, p. 239

San Francisco isn’t in the same country as Lakeside anymore than New Orleans is in the same country as New York or Miami is in the same country as Minneapolis.

— Wednesday, in a conversation with Shadow, p. 239 of American Gods

 

More Shadows: 3rd Street, San Francisco and Mendocino

Whether you’re taking a selfie silhouette on the ground, capturing the lines and patterns on the walls while walking your city’s streets, or recording the subtle ways the light hits your subject’s face as she sits next to a window, these different types of shadows you see can add a complex, unexpected layer to your shot.

— Cheri Lucas Rowlands, The Daily Post

insitunopeopleshadow

In Situ, SF Museum of Modern Art, 3rd St.

insitupasserbyshadow

Umbrella Passing In Situ

roofmendocinoshadow

Mendocino: January 2017

 

 

Shadow: The Daily Post Photo Challenge, 8 February 2017

This week’s Daily Post Photo Challenge is SHADOW.

Self loves shadows. Shadows add so much mystery. Here’s what self means:

manontrainshadows

Man Leaving a Train

fogmendocinoshadows

Morning, Fog, Mendocino: January 2017

nightsanfranciscoshadow

Night, San Francisco: While Riding a Cab

Debut Novel, University of Hawai’i Press

THE CHARM BUYERS, by Lillian Howan, is a novel that describes extraordinary beauty and turbulent change: Tahiti during the last years of French nuclear testing in the Pacific in the 1990s. Tahiti in the 1990s is a place where a supernatural, shamanistic reality exists together with the traditions of the Hakka Chinese, set against the background of the French colonial past and the Ma’ohi struggle for independence. It presents a world in transition and its people — black pearl cultivators, artists, taro farmers, politicians, smugglers, and shamans.

The Charm Buyers is a thought-provoking insight into a time of cultural change. It captures an essence of existing between reality and surreality, dreaming and wakefulness, the past and the future. (Foreword Reviews)

Book Launch!

Wednesday, 15 February 2017
5 p.m.
Maier Room, Fromm Hall
University of San Francisco

FREE AND OPEN TO ALL

Sponsored by the Master of Arts in Asia Pacific Studies, Asian Pacific American Studies, and the Center for Asia Pacific Studies.

Solitude: The Daily Post Photo Challenge

“Show us what being alone means to you.”
— Jen H., The Daily Post

Self never feels more alone than when she’s on the train, surrounded by people listening to iPods:

dscn9825

And there is something incredibly solitary about these people on a train platform:

dscn9649

Cats are solitary creatures: Agree/disagree? The cat’s name is Chester. He lives in Calgary:

dscn9423

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

Apple Mother Ship, Downtown San Francisco: Repurpose 3

The Apple Store in Union Square, downtown San Francisco, is like a sleek gray spaceship in the middle of a city whose frayed and raucous streets are becoming more Blade Runner in feeling, every day.

Here’s the courtyard behind the store: There’s a wall of moss. It’s a very conscious attempt to create a space of tranquility in the middle of chaos.

mosswallappleunionsquare

Apple’s Flagship Store, Union Square, San Francisco

loveapplestoreunionsquare

Next to the Wall of Moss, a 60s-Reminiscent Sign

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

Laundry Day: Looking Out the Window

dscn0743

Bush Street, San Francisco: Last Day of January 2017

“Before the Devil Knows You’re Dead” (2007): Sidney Lumet’s Last Movie

Philip Seymour Hoffman plays Andy, a plump, middle-aged real-estate wheeler/dealer whose world comes crashing down on him in a very big way, after he has the genius idea of knocking off his parents’ mom-and-pop jewelry store in a Westchester mall (It’s like Fargo, only twice as painful):

Andy to his brother Hank (Ethan Hawke):

  • It’s too late to think. It’s too late.

Also, Seymour Hoffman’s character is a cocaine addict. Watching him do a line is gut-wrenching.

dscn0737

Noir City: San Francisco’s 15th Annual Film Noir Festival, at the Castro

Stay tuned.

Quote of the Day: San Francisco Chronicle (26 January 2017)

  • “We’re still a sanctuary city.”

— Ed Lee, Mayor of San Francisco, quoted in a San Francisco Chronicle Editorial on Immigration Policy (“His wall won’t work”)

« Older entries