Sentence of the Day: Shuggie Bain

  • She got her teeth from her daddy’s side and the Cambpell teeth had always been weak, they were a reason for humility in an otherwise handsome face.

Even though she’s just starting, self can see why this novel won the 2020 Booker Prize. It’s the voice.

Stay safe, dear blog readers. Stay safe.

Eight Days on a Fishing Boat from Newlyn

Lamorna Ash is a beautiful writer. Self appreciates the precision in the following description, especially “they will repeat this performance over fifty times more in the week to come”:

Dressed in their oilskins, the men head out onto the uncovered deck to spread the nets ready for the first haul. They will repeat this performance over fifty times more in the week to come. The ancient, bird-like being heaves her wings back up, pulling the chainmail-clinking nets high up into the air above us, before dropping them down into the water with a smack. They break its surface and disappear beneath. The nets will remain sunken for the next few hours, stroking along the seabed, gathering fish into their cod-ends.

The salt-licked wind makes my eyes red . . .

Dark, Salt, Clear: The Life of a Fishing Town, p. 33

And since self has so many pictures from her own trip to Cornwall in 2019, she’ll just throw in one more, why not?

Self Wishing She Could

frame p. 505 of A Promised Land because everything you need to know about Lindsey Graham is there in two paragraphs.

Stay safe, dear blog readers. Stay safe.

Next book: a young woman decides to spend a year in Cornwall after a life drawing class in which the model is a fifty-something fisherman. Self heard the woman writes pretty well, too: Dark, Salt, Clear: Life in a Cornish Fishing Town, by Lamorna Ash.

Sentence of the Day: A Promised Land, p. 38

44 writes too, too well. Self can see it now: a sentence of the day two, maybe even three, times a day.

This (2nd) sentence of the day comes right after a scene where Obama flies to LA at a friend’s invitation to attend the 2000 Democratic Convention, finds that he can’t rent a car to the Staples Center because his American Express card is over its limit, manages to get over there anyway (though he doesn’t spell out how), then finds himself “haplessly” circling “the perimeter” and “watching the festivities on mounted TV screens” because “the credential my friend had secured . . . didn’t allow entry to the convention floor.” He flies home in a “dark mood,” fuming about being “almost forty” and “broke.”

Without further ado, THE SECOND SENTENCE OF THE DAY!

  • I recognized that in running for Congress I’d been driven not by some selfless dream of changing the world, but rather by the need to justify the choices I had already made, or to satisfy my ego, or to quell my envy of those who had achieved what I had not.

In the above sentence, Obama makes multiple uses of the Oxford comma. Use this sentence as Exhibit A if you are ever doubtful of the power of a correctly placed Oxford comma!

Stay safe, dear blog readers, stay safe.

Sentence of the Day: Barack Obama

As a general rule, I’m a slow walker — a Hawaiian walk, Michelle likes to say, sometimes with a hint of impatience.

— Chapter 1, A Promised Land

The words of 44 are very clear and precise. He was a great President. You can tell by the way he writes, which is also the way you can tell how a man thinks. And 44 is a very, very good writer.

America was so lucky to have him.

Stay safe, dear blog readers. Stay safe.

Sentence of the Day: Ice Walker

So that the author does not have to keep repeating Ice Walker ad infinitum, he has given the subject of this book a name: Nanu.

Nice! Has echoes of Nanook of the North, the groundbreaking 1922 documentary by Robert Flaherty.

Without further ado, the Sentence:

  • Nanu jams her feet onto the floor of the aglu, snatches the seal and flings it out onto the surface of the ice, where blood belches into the new snow. (Chapter 1: Circling)

This is a very vivid book.

Stay safe, dear blog readers. Stay safe.

Ice Walker!

The beginning of Ice Walker: A Polar Bear’s Journey Through the Fragile Arctic is so captivating, just as The Butterfly Effect‘s opening chapters were. Hope author James Raffan is able to keep the focus on polar bears, not drift into a depiction of human activity — all self wants is nature, all the time.

What she loved so much about Eddie’s Boy, which she blazed through a few days ago, was how relentless it was. The book was about a hitman, and he stayed hitman to the very end, no apologies. She appreciates Thomas Perry’s singular focus. You would think a reader would find all the killing pretty rote by the end — but no, it stayed fresh. Again, kudos to Thomas Perry.

Chapter One of Ice Walkers (“Circling”) is gripping:

  • She stops and sniffs the frigid air, with almost no vapor trail from her mouth or nose. In a frozen world where liquid freshwater for drinking is absent, she draws on metabolic water created by the burning of seal fat, her main food source. The outside air is desert dry, but the air in her lungs is humid. Somehow she is able to conserve moisture and stay sufficiently hydrated, even when running or exerting herself physically in the hunt, when a human would soon die from winter dehydration. Every one of these adaptations is a marvel that has taken untold generations to evolve. These are not physiological changes that can respond to seasonal or even annual environmental shifts.

Onward!

Eddie’s Boy was a very satisfying read. So fleet of foot! No anguished moralizing! Only kill, kill, kill!

Next: Ice Walker: A Polar Bear’s Journey Through the Fragile Arctic, by James Raffan.

Opening Sentence:

  • “Imagine you are in the International Space Station, curving over North America.

Love it!

But oh no, coming from behind is a book about insects, The Butterfly Effect: Insects and the Making of the Modern World, by Edward D. Melillo.

Self may wind up going for the insect book.

Stay safe, dear blog readers. Stay safe.

Over-the-Top

Since Eddie’s Boy began (actually, also in the two days since she started reading), so many things have happened to the hero/hitman. After he was targeted in York (York! City of cathedrals!), Michael Schaeffer (yes, MC does have a name) headed to Manchester Airport (which was smart, because Gatwick and Heathrow have security cams all over the place) and flew to SYDNEY.

SYDNEY, as in Sydney, Australia.

Before you can say two sneezes, he’s attacked twice, the first time on the airport express to downtown Sydney (Scary/good scene! It goes down in exactly 13 minutes).

So, having determined that Sydney was a VERY BAD IDEA (LOL), he takes another flight, this time to the U.S.

It’s a good thing this was written before pandemic, or Michael would have no recourse except — maybe an island in the middle of the Pacific?

Wait, why didn’t he go to an island in the middle of the Pacific? Surely, it would be hard for hitmen to escape detection there — fewer people, etc etc

As a matter of fact, self has already written this story: in her story, the island isn’t deserted because it’s an island in the Philippines, which is over-populated. Her story’s called “Sand,” and it’s coming out later this year in Pembroke Magazine.

Stay safe, dear blog readers. Stay safe.

pp. 53 – 58, EDDIE’S BOY

It takes only five pages for Thomas Perry to describe what goes down on an airport express train to downtown Sydney.

From the top of p. 53 to the bottom of p. 58: non-stop action and HELL YEAH!

« Older entries

The life of B

Mainly through the lens of a Nikon

myguiltypleasures

welcome to my past, present and future mixed with whatever pops up right now

Iain Kelly

Fiction Writing

John's Space .....

"Two roads diverged in a wood, and I— I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all the difference." The Road Not Taken, by Robert Frost

nancy merrill photography

capturing memories one moment at a time

Rantings Of A Third Kind

The Blog about everything and nothing and it's all done in the best possible taste!

Sauce Box

Never get lost in the Sauce

GK Dutta

Be One... Make One...

Cee's Photo Challenges

Teaching the art of composition for photography.

Fashion Not Fear

Fueling fearlessness through fashion and inspiration.

Wanderlust and Wonderment

My writing and photo journey of inspiration and discovery

transcribingmemory

Decades of her words.

John Oliver Mason

Observations about my life and the world around me.

Insanity at its best!

Yousuf Bawany's Blog

lita doolan productions

Any old world uncovered by new writing

unbolt me

the literary asylum

CSP Archives

Archive of the CSP

The 100 Greatest Books Challenge

A journey from one end of the bookshelf to the other