Books, Sunday Observer, 21 April 2019 (Easter Sunday)

Self is interested in reading the books on the list below:

  • Small Days and Nights, by Tishani Doshi (novel)
  • Don’t Touch My Hair, by Emma Dabiri (nonfiction)
  • The Road to Grantchester, by James Runcie (mystery)
  • Hey! Listen! by Steve McNeil (a journey through the golden age of video games)
  • The Price of Paradise: How the Suicide Bomber Shaped the Modern Age, by Iain Overton (history)
  • The Confessions of Frannie Langton, by Sara Collins (debut novel)

Rising, p. 160 (in which #metoo meets #climatechange)

On p. 160 is — big surprise — not some genuinely hair-rising fact about how we’re all going to be wiped off the face of the planet by rapidly rising ocean levels, but an account of how Rush was sexually harassed by a senior colleague.

This is really brave of Rush. Because her whole message about climate change comes dangerously close to never seeing the light of day — not that the harasser was necessarily *that* powerful, but she was assailed with self-doubt (Did I invite his advances? Is this all my fault?)

Eventually I tell Samuel that I cannot continue our professional relationship and I tell him why. First he says, “Oh my god.” Then he says, “I had no idea.” Followed by, “I don’t remember.” And then, “I had no further intentions.” He says, “I love my family.” And, “let me know when you get over it.” The words spill out of him fast like floodwater.

Nice parallel, words with floodwater.

Samuel and the author are about to take a swim somewhere near Pensacola, Florida when he stops her by putting both hands on his shoulders, turns her around, and presses his lips to a tattoo on her back (The tattoo is a quote by e. e. cummings)

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

RISING, p. 50

It used to be that we thought earth’s climate and its underlying geology changed slowly and steadily over time, like the tortoise who beat the hare. But now we know the opposite to be mostly true. The earth’s geophysical make-up doesn’t tend to incrementally evolve; it jerks back and forth between different equilibriums. Ice age, then greenhouse. Glaciers covering the island of Manhattan in a thousand-foot-thick sheet of ice, then a city of eight million people in that same spot.

RISING, DISPATCHES FROM THE NEW AMERICAN SHORE, p. 45

Lately my feeling is that I need time to just be here before I can decide whether to stay or not. My guess is that I will tap into so much gratitude for my life alongside this marsh that I may just become an old lady who drowns right here.

— Laura Sewell, resident of Small Point, Maine

Rising, p. 34

In the photo Chris shows me, his father stands surrounded by pastures. You can even make out a black cow in the upper right corner. In the sixty years since, the meadows where the cattle used to graze have all slipped beneath the surface of the sea.

“Maybe You Can Swim”

“Maybe you could swim,” the owner of the Pointe-aux-Chenes marina tells me when I ask if I can get to the Isles de Jean Charles without a car. “But I wouldn’t, on account of the gators.”

Rising: Dispatches from the New American shore, p. 20

 

Reading Francisco Cantu’s “Boundary Conditions” (The New Yorker, 11 March 2019)

The militarization of the borderlands has become so commonplace that one often grows numb to its manifestations. — Francisco Cantu

In his article, a review of Greg Grandin’s The End of the Myth: From the Frontier to the Border Wall in the Mind of America, Cantu shows how the words border and frontier co-exist in the American mind.

The review begins:

On Election Day 2018, residents of Nogales, Arizona began to notice a single row of coiled razor wire growing across the top of the city’s border wall.

Riveting.

The Admiral’s Dream

From The Sea Is One, an Introduction to Sea Power: The History and Geopolitics of the World’s Oceans by Admiral James Stavridis (Penguin Press, 2017):

The approaches to land are always difficult in my dreams, and the ship often finds herself running out of deep water and becomes rapidly in danger of foundering on a beach or up a river or upon a reef. I always wake up before the ship finally impales herself ashore, and I always wish I had stayed farther out to sea.

DSCN0028

 

Sea Power: The History and Geopolitics of the World’s Oceans

Found this book in Gallery Bookshop, Mendocino, last year.

Love any book on Sea Power. Because oceans are life. And self loves reading about them.

DSCN0137

The World’s Oceans: Shipping Lanes and Choke Points, from Sea Power: The History and Geopolitics of the World’s Oceans, by Admiral James Stavridis (Ret.)

Stay tuned.

Currently Reading: The Economist, 2 March 2019

Catching up with The Economist this morning.

Interesting review in the Books section, 2 March 2019:

DSCN0136

 

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