Summer Reading: July

During the month of July, self read seven books.

The seventh is The Midnight Library, by Matt Haig, which she began yesterday (Enjoying it hugely. Has Bridget Jones Diary feelz, at least the opening pages do, but darker)

She read two self-help psychology books, two histories (Savage Continent: Europe in the Aftermath of World War II, by Keith Lowe, and The Reason Why, by Cecil Woodham-Smith, about the mistakes that led to the Charge of the Light Brigade at Balaclava), a murder mystery (The Thursday Murder Club, by Richard Osman, which she hugely enjoyed), and her second Elizabeth Kolbert: Under a White Sky: The Nature of the Future.

Onward!

Stay cool, dear blog readers. Stay cool.

Question of the Day

How do the pensioners in The Thursday Murder Club know about the Dark Web when self only heard about it a month ago?

She’s on p. 181.

Also, it turns out, the DCI likes Oasis. OASIS.

Normally, she would just barrel through to the end (especially as it’s getting pretty exciting), but today has had all sorts of appointments, and she’s meeting someone for dinner — DINNER! — at the Beach Chalet. Her cousin from Manila, who’s only here for a few days.

Stay cool (it’s hard, that sun’s like a laser), dear blog readers. Stay cool.

Seducing the DCI

Detective Chief Inspector Chris Hudson is not a bad man. He opens doors for his (female) partner and doesn’t act like he expects to be thanked for it. But he tried to ignore the four octogenarian pensioners of the Thursday Murders Club, and they punished him by giving his partner a couch all to herself — a couch big enough for her to sit with legs folded up beneath her! — while he has to sit on a couch big enough for “two and a half”, a pensioner boxing him in on either side while they pepper him with questions about an ongoing investigation.

“So you do have a suspect? How wonderful. What do you make of the coffee and walnut?” says Joyce.

Chris lifts a slice of coffee and walnut cake to his mouth and takes a bite. Also better than M&S. Joyce, you wizard. Also, it was a well-known fact that there were no calories in homemade cakes.

The Thursday Murder Club, p. 108

Stay cool, dear blog readers. Stay cool.

Sentence of the Day! Definitely, the Sentence of the Day

  • It brought back all the things she loved about South London: murder, drugs, someone who carried off a “no comment” with a bit of panache. — The Thursday Murder Club, p. 90

Early Warning System

So every day Elizabeth opens her diary to a date two weeks ahead and writes herself a question. And every day she answers a question she set herself two weeks ago.

The Thursday Murder Club, p. 87

Dearest Mum had her own strategy: she had a huge calendar, and different colored marking pens. Gradually, self noticed that she began spending more and more time poring over it. Could have been as far back as 15 years ago. That must have been when she was just in her late 60s.

Dearest Mum came to visit self in California and started talking about this wonderful restaurant in Half Moon Bay called Gibraltar, a place she said she had just discovered. Self was quiet. Dearest Mum looked over. “What? I’ve told you this story before,” she said, looking for the first time in her life very unnerved.

“No. I was the one who took you to that restaurant. A friend in Half Moon Bay told me about it.”

So, the dementia started a long time ago. Could even have been as far back as 20 years ago. But Dearest Mum had this habit of being very gay and charming. If anyone noticed, they didn’t say a word.

Self is hugely enjoying The Thursday Murder Club.

Most of the mysteries she has read this year have been ace:

  • Find You First, by Linwood Barclay
  • One Fatal Flaw, by Anne Perry
  • All the Devils are Here, by Louise Penny
  • Eddie’s Boy, by Thomas Perry

Stay cool, dear blog readers. Stay cool.

Octogenarians Do London

We could have got another black cab straight back to the station, but Elizabeth wanted to have a stroll, and so we did. I don’t know if you know Mayfair — there are no shops you would actually buy anything in, but it was very pleasant. We stopped for coffee in a Costa. It was in a beautiful building, which Elizabeth said used to be a pub and where she and a lot of her colleagues would drink. We stayed there for a while, and talked about what we’d learned.

If today was anything to go by, this whole murder investigation is going to be the most enormous fun.

The Thursday Murder Club, p. 84

btw, reading this book is enormous fun.

“They turned the Adelphi into a Travelodge …”

The Thursday Murder Club, p. 51:

  • I know that Bernard will be in his customary position at the back. I always feel like I would like to sit next to him — he is jolly company when he turns his mind to it — but I know he visits Fairhaven for his late wife, so I leave him in peace. That’s where they met, and that’s where they lived before they moved in here. He told me that since she died he would go to the Adelphi Hotel, where she used to work, and polish off a couple of glasses of wine, overlooking the sea. That’s how I first found out about the minibus, if I’m honest, so silver linings. They turned the Adelphi into a Travelodge last year, so now Bernard sits on the pier.

Top Dialogue: The Thursday Murder Club

“I have a job for you, Ibrahim,” says Elizabeth, sipping a mint tea. “Well, a job for you and Ron, but I’m putting you in charge.”

“Very wise,” says Ibrahim, nodding. “If I might say.”

Quote of the Day: The Thursday Murder Club, pp. 37 – 38

  • “She must be fifty,” Ian thinks, same age as him. Different for women, though . . . If that meant having to flirt with a fifty-year-old for a couple of weeks, then so be it . . . As he shakes Karen’s hand, Ian thinks that using a bit of hand cream every now and again wouldn’t kill her. Fifty! He wouldn’t wish it on anyone.

Ian’s thinking is apropos of THE VILLAIN. THE VILLAIN. THE VILLAIN!

That is all.

Quote of the Day: The Thursday Murder Club

“Big is the same as small. There’s just more of it.”

The Thursday Murder Club, Ch. 5, p. 25

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