Other Quests

Liking these WordPress bloggers’ takes on this week’s Photo Challenge:  QUEST

Check them out!

Stay tuned.

Quest: Daily Post Photo Challenge, 23 September 2016

We have a new Daily Post Photo Challenge, dropped today by Cheri Lucas Rowlands, QUEST:

  • What are you in search for? Capture your quest with your camera.

Here are some photos from self’s (huge) stash of photos that she thinks emblemize QUEST:

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An Ed Ruscha: Currently on Exhibit at the De Young Museum

And here’s from a handmade book self saw at the Legion of Honor:

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Illustrated Book at the Legion of Honor, Text is by San Francisco Poet Wallace Ting

Every new story is a quest. Here are two pages of her draft for “Ice” (forthcoming from Bellingham Review):

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Two Pages of Self’s Manuscript for “Ice,” One of Her Dystopian Fantasies

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

 

Edgy de Young Museum

Several weeks ago, self spent a day at the de Young, to see an Ed Ruscha exhibit.

My goodness, it was amazing.

She took a break for coffee in the sculpture garden. Here’s the pedestrian walkway over the café’s outdoor seating. VERY edgy:

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Pedestrian Walkway, de Young Museum, Golden Gate Park

Entrance lobby of the de Young: Everything is edgy.

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Looking down at the Main Lobby from the second floor: You really see edges!

Finally, an “End” is an EDGE. Of sorts:

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Ed Ruscha’s “The End,” Viewed in the de Young Museum in Golden Gate Park, August 2016

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

Poetry in the Galleries/ Legion of Honor

Participants in the Poetry in the Galleries project were 4th through 8th graders from the San Francisco Bay Area.

The students were invited to write a poem in response to an object in the Legion of Honor’s ancient art galleries.

Some of the results were published in a small pamphlet and distributed by the Fine Arts Museums.

Here’s one of self’s favorites:

Black-Glaze Mug, South Italian, mid-4th century BC

Small, insignificantly small.
Ancient people used me for reasons unknown.
I am a black mystery to the future of people.

— Matthew Gallelo, 8th Grade, Immaculate Heart of Mary School, Belmont

Stay tuned, dear blog readers Stay tuned.

Mirror 2

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Dining Table, Park Avenue, New York City, May 2016

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Puddle, Tyrone Guthrie Centre at Annaghmakerrig, Spring 2016

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The Iron Lady Herself, British National Portrait Gallery, April 2016: The bottom half of the painting is actually a mirror, reflecting the legs of the viewers. But they look like they’re the legs of the subjects in the Portrait!

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

Mirror: The Daily Post Photo Challenge, 2 September 2016

  • This week’s challenge is all about reflections.

— Jen H., The Daily Post

Here is self’s first take:

Noelle Q. de Jesus reading from her first short story collection, Blood, at the San Francisco Main Library, 100 Larkin Street, 23 August 2016:

(The table is a reflective surface)

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Noelle Q. de Jesus (in red and black top) and Edwin Lozada, who organized the reading: August 23, 2016, San Francisco Main Library

A man is reflected in an Ed Ruscha work at the de Young Museum in San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park, about a month ago:

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An Ed Ruscha at the de Young Museum, August 2016

Final photo: the sculpture garden at the de Young Museum, August 2016. That refective ball is pretty fabulous!

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Sculpture Garden, outside the de Young Museum in Golden Gate Park, August 2016

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

Edward Hopper, Jo Hopper, and the Whitney Museum

This passage is too sad. Jo Hopper, Edward Hopper’s wife, was a painter. But she painted very little after she married (She was 41, Edward was almost 42).

. . .  it is almost impossible to form a judgement of Jo Hopper’s work, since so little of it has survived. Edward left everything to his wife, asking that she bequeath his art to the Whitney, the institution with which he’d had the closest ties. After his death, she donated both his and the majority of her own artistic estates to the museum, even though she’d felt from the moment of her marriage that she’d been a victim of a boycott by the curators there. Her disquiet was not unwarranted. After her death, the Whitney discarded all her paintings, perhaps because of their calibre and perhaps because of the systematic undervaluing of women’s art against which she’d railed so bitterly in her own life.

— “Walls of Glass,” Essay # 2 in Olivia Laing’s The Lonely City: Adventures in the Art of Being Alone

 

 

THE LONELY CITY: Edward Hopper

The Lonely City, by Olivia Laing, is a work of nonfiction.

It’s a collection of essays about lonely people.

Self’s on Essay # 2, “Walls of Glass,” which delves into the work of painter Edward Hopper and one painting in particular, Nighthawks, which can be seen at the Whitney (one of self’s favorite New York museums).

The painting is something the author returns to, again and again, during a lonely fall. She followed a lover to New York and it didn’t work out. Something about Hopper’s painting resonates with her.

Self decided to throw in a photograph of her own. It documents her enduring fascination with windows, her fascination with glimpses of other lives. Photo after the excerpt:

All photographs are silent, but some are more silent than others, and these portraits attest to what was by all accounts Hopper’s most striking feature, his gigantic resistance to speech. It’s a different thing from quietness, silence; more powerful, more aggressive. In his interviews, it functions as a barrier, preventing the interviewer from opening him up or putting words into his mouth. When he does speak, it’s often simply to deflect the question. “I don’t remember,” he says frequently, or “I don’t know why I did that.” He regularly uses the word unconscious, as a way of evading or disclaiming whatever meaning the interviewer believes to be seeping from his pictures.

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Windows are portals. When self looks through a window — any window — her imagination takes flight.

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

 

 

 

Details 2: Spring and Summer 2016

Discover the intimate details of something unexpected.

— Jen H., The Daily Post

Self’s go-to summer sandal: low heel, super-comfy, and bright orange. Summer’s all about comfort and freedom: her feet are happy.

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This is New York City, May 2016, during an unexpected lull in a frantic week:

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Park Avenue Nocturne: Self only just noticed the little squares of lighted windows from the buildings across the street. The view is from her brother-in-law’s apartment in Manhattan.

Finally, self was able to visit Bletchley Park, just outside London, in early June. It was an overcast day, self got to the park early, before the crowds arrived. In fact, self was the only person walking from the train station that morning.

She hasn’t seen The Imitation Game, the movie about the codebreakers of Bletchley Park, but there’s an exhibit of costumes used during the filming, and Benedict Cumberbatch is on the audio guide.

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Whatever self expected when she visited Bletchley Park in June, she never expected the grounds to be so lovely. There was a lake full of ducks and very approachable swans.

Highly recommend a visit to Bletchley Park. The exhibits include an actual Enigma machine. The history is just palpable.

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

Look Up: The Daily Post Photo Challenge, 8 July 2016

For this week’s challenge, take a moment to look up. Whether it’s the fan above your head at work, your bedroom ceiling, or the night sky, what do you see?

— Nancy Thanki, The Daily Post

First Photo: The British Museum’s Antiquities Gallery, April 2016

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Self held the camera high over her head for the shot. The Rosetta Stone is in the glass case just to the left (where all the people are looking)

Second Photo: The figure below is on the roof of the building that formerly housed the Oxford University Press, in Oxford, UK.

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Oxford, UK: May 2016

Third Photo: The Garden of the Victoria & Albert Museum in London

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Outdoor Art Installation, Victoria & Albert Museum, London: June 2016 (Cool canopy, that, don’t you agree?)

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

 

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