Currently Reading: The Economist, 2 March 2019

Catching up with The Economist this morning.

Interesting review in the Books section, 2 March 2019:

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Prairie Schooner: The Opioid Issue (Winter 2018), Guest Edited by Glenna Luschei

Ray Murphy, from a letter quoted in the Introduction by Glenna Luschei:

Virtually all of my writing about opiates stems from writing about injury. I never address opiates as a recreational drug. Be interesting to see how many other submissions you get that come out of injury and pain, and then progress into dependency and possibly full-blown addiction.

The second piece in the issue is Marsha de la O’s Paradise Motel. An excerpt:

Black flame, blue spoon, now the shadow
draws close a cloak as wide as Lake Michigan,
robed and rocked in god’s water, rippling
indigo. From out on the street the rush of cars

weave through their harmonies —
those vessels I’ve entered one by one,
riding out currents on a raft of fire.

Marsha de la O’s new collection, Every Ravening Thing, is just out from Pitt Poetry.

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Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

 

New Year, New Issues: Prairie Schooner and Calyx

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Just Arrived: Sunday, 6 January 2019

SPREAD THE WORD.

Just Out: PRAIRIE SCHOONER, Fall 2018

Cover piece is by artist Amanda Smith.

The opening piece is Demographic Futures, a short story by Phong Nguyen. Nguyen is the author of two short story collections and, most recently, the novel The Adventures of Joe Harper.

There is also fiction by Nigerian writer Jekwu Anyaegbuna and award-winning writer Cyril Dabydeen.

There is poetry by Cave Canem fellow Mary Moore Easter, Cody Smith, and Osel Jessica Plante, and essays by Sian Griffiths (about San Jose’s Winchester Mystery House!), Caroline Crew, and Evanthia Bromiley.

And so many other fine writers self doesn’t have time or space to list, but go over to Prairie Schooner and explore for yourselves.

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

Poetry Sunday: Luisa A. Igloria

Cascade

What I want is immediacy, the nub
of the moment processed without doubt
into my side, the tremor that comes
sometimes before sight, before taste
or touch. Whatever might be lost, don’t
take that away from me: stars pouring
out of the firmament, not ever holding
back the flood over my small ladle.

— included in the collection The Buddha Wonders If She Is Having a Mid-Life Crisis (Montreal: Phoenicia Publishing, 2018)

Luisa A. Igloria is a poet, a creative writing professor (Old Dominion University), a 2014 winner of the May Swenson Prize and, most recently, the 2018 winner of the Center for Book Arts’ Letterpress Chapbook Competition.

Cost of Paper, vol. 5 (published by 1888 Center, Orange, CA)

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Sadly, both the AWP2019 panel proposals self was included in were rejected. One was a mixed-genre panel, the brainchild of Philadelphia poet Anne-Adele Wight. The other was a Quarterly West panel on experimental fiction.

Nevertheless, self still has much to celebrate. Such as, her story This Is End being in The Cost of Paper, vol. 5 (It’s the last story in the anthology). The anthology’s editor was Julianne Berokoff.

Self just had another story picked up for the Winter 2018 issue of Prairie Schooner, due out this December. And the two stories couldn’t be more different: the one in The Cost of Paper is space fantasy, the Prairie Schooner story is straight-up realism.

This Is End is the third story in a cycle about a boy named Dragon, a missing girl named Her, a teacher named Fire Lizard, a bully named Big, the bully’s friend Drinker, and a new student named Knot.

Dragon saw Big knock Her out cold (in the middle of a class, why). Her never came back to class, but sometimes Dragon thinks he sees her waving to him from a window of an abandoned space station called the Kobayashi Maru. Ever since then, he’s been itching for revenge.

Big doesn’t show up to class one day, Knot asks Dragon:

“Is it true? Tumor he had?”

We spot-check each other for tumors. We’re so afraid of it.

“Ecchymosis?” Knot persists.

Here’s a link to 1888 Center’s Bookstore.

Stay tuned.

 

 

 

 

Please Read: THE COST OF PAPER

Volume 5 of 1888 Center’s annual anthology series, The Cost of Paper, launched a few months ago.

The reason for the title is — the 1888 Center charges only the cost of what you hold in your hand: $4.95.

Please read, share, spread the news. List of authors:

  • Marianne Villanueva: This Is End
  • Samuel Parker Smith: A Guide to First-Time Traveling
  • Javier Ulloa: The Trials and Trails of Slimi the Trail
  • Matthew Serback: The March and the Ides of the Penguins
  • Cassandra Passarelli: Cane Stalks
  • Daniel Uncapher: Moral Conviction
  • Ruth Nolan: Memorial Burn
  • Shaun Turner: Something Special
  • Elena Dypiangco: One Reason to Drop Out
  • Lucas Ege Mautner: Letter to the Editor
  • Dustin Davenport: Night Time
  • Samuel Cole: Linger In What We Do
  • Elline Lipkin: Poems
  • William Francis Deverell: Driftwood
  • Shay Azoulay: The Bard of Hastings
  • Steven Wojtowicz: The Sign
  • Amy Sara Lim: Imagination
  • Dimple Shah: Manic Monday
  • Dean Moses: A Cobweb of Sins
  • Arianna Basco: The Torch
  • Brian May: The Red Glove
  • Jian Huang: Dream House
  • Faisal Khan: Third Bird’s Laments
  • Susie Griffith: Commuter Train
  • Douglas Cowie: Weaver’s Sundries
  • Daniel Cameides: Tobacco and Dead Things
  • Aaron Weddle: A Bitter Reunion
  • Chelsea Sutton: And She Kept Walking

There’s a lot of stories. Going to have to post in stages. Stay tuned.

Poetry Saturday: Keith Tuma

excerpt from Tanka Notebook, in the collection Climbing into the Orchestra (2017)

On the sidewalk a giant onion perfectly peeled
tucked in a plastic baggie and still fresh
three days after I notice it.


Keith Tuma teaches at Miami University (Ohio), where he edits the Miami University Press. Recent books include On Leave: A Book of Anecdotes (Salt, 2011).

 

Just Published: THE COST OF PAPER, Vol. 5, an International Anthology of Short Fiction

Published April 3 by 1888 Center in Orange, CA. Series Editor: Julianne Berokoff.

Self was so busy with the DAMN TAXES that she didn’t have time to announce, much less celebrate.

The anthology includes her short story, “This Is End.” In the story, Dragon’s BFF Her is possibly deceased but her ghost appears and re-appears. Dragon thinks he’s seen her on the wreck of the space station the Kobayashi Maru (Yes, the choice of name is self’s little homage to Star Trek):

  • It caught fire. The wreckage drifted, was lost. Then found. Then lost, and found again.

Parts 1 and 2 of this story are on Juked.com and Quarterly West, respectively. The Juked.com story, “First Life,” is available, here’s the link. Not sure where to find it on the Quarterly West site (Story Title: “First Causes”)

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

 

 

#amreading: Kelly Creighton

My mother wants a girl, I said, but I know it’s a boy, all the trouble he’s given me.

— “Bank Holiday Hurricane,” the title story of Kelly Creighton’s short story collection

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