#amwriting: THIS IS END

#amwritingdystopia #amwritingfantasy #amwritinghorror

sequel to her stories First Life (in Juked.com) and First Causes (in Quarterly West)

Floating, off to the right: the remains of the former space station, the Kobayashi Maru.

It caught fire. The wreckage drifted, was lost. Then found. Then lost, and found again.


Ice, another of her dystopian stories, will be in the Fall issue of Bellingham Review, which drops Nov. 15.

Stay tuned.

Self’s Very Own Apocalyptic Dystopia

Why on earth would self be quoting from The 100 when she has written her own story of apocalyptic dystopia that was published just a few months ago?

Right? Right?

Here again is something from “The Freeze” (Bluestem, Spring 2015). When she realizes how long the story is — it’s a miracle. It’s written in very hallucinatory prose. And she was able to go on like that, without switching voice, for almost 20 pages? Self is always surprised when she can pull something like that off.

To tell the truth, every one of her speculative fiction stories is an experiment. Beginning with the extremely short story, “The Departure,” published in Philippine Genre Stories (thanks to Charles Tan, who solicited it for their very first issue).

She likes applying the dreamy voice to her science fiction.

Moving along.

There is a very terrifying scene in “The Freeze.” But she will skip right over that because she is quite distressed herself after reading it.

No sign of Annie. She had been taken by a great, invisible force. Up, towards the light? Or down to the sea. Who knew?

If there was no body, there could not be a death. That comforted me.

I walked in the gloomy dark until I heard, far away but distinct, the sound of waves pounding the cliffs.

Descend.

Almost overnight, the temperature dropped, and dropped, and dropped.

Mr. King, the old man who lived next door, said, It’s just a cold spell. It will pass.

But two weeks later, it was dark almost the whole day.

The roses blackened, my teeth chattered in my head.

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

These Characters Self Writes

Self adores FictionFeed.net for doing that piece on her. She’s started following them on Twitter.

The writer of the piece (on her story “First Life” in Juked) is listed simply as Curator. Here’s an excerpt:

No, the story isn’t particularly out of the ordinary, but its narrator (a boy by the name of Dragon) makes up for that in spades, with a wildly unusual voice and bendy-spoon perspective that basically defamiliarize the story’s world in its entirety.

Some time ago, self began writing stories about male characters on the edge, she’s not sure why.

Recently, she’s been thinking of another of her Male-Characters-on-the-Edge, from a story called “Crackers” that appeared in Crab Ochard Review’s The West Coast & Beyond Issue (Vol. 19, No. 2, which is also going to be the focus of a panel in next year’s AWP: Midwest Magazine Searches for West Coast Writers, YAY!).

Crab Orchard Literary Review's The West Coast & Beyond Issue (Vol. 19, No. 2, Summer/Fall 2014)

Crab Orchard Literary Review’s The West Coast & Beyond Issue (Vol. 19, No. 2, Summer/Fall 2014)

Hello, “Crackers” is speculative fiction, so of course crazy. Do not expect real-world Philippines, and you will be okay:

In December 2012, I finally emerged from the wild mountain fastness of the Philippines. My left shoulder had a tattoo of a python, my right a tattoo of a kris, the blade of choice of the mountain tribes. I wore a necklace of red parrot beaks. I spoke only in monosyllables. They said I was crackers.

They made me register at the Palo Alto VA for a psychiatric evaluation.

Thank you, Juked, thank you, Crab Orchard Literary Review, for taking a chance on self’s crazy writing.

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

Speculative Fiction: Before “The Hand”, there was “Lizard”

Frederick Barthelme, self loves you for picking “The Hand” to win the Juked Fiction Prize in 2007.

Before “The Hand” (which Dean Alfar and Nikki Alfar included in Philippine Speculative Fiction, vol. III, and which Anvil published as part of self’s new collection, The Lost Language), there was “Lizard,”  which was part of Ginseng and Other Tales From Manila, published by Calyx in 1991.

Here’s an excerpt:

She saw her mother leaning against a corner of the house, waving a palm-leaf fan slowly back and forth across her face.  Her mother had not seen her.  She was looking down at the ground and seemed to be thinking.  Just at the moment when Wito would have called out to her, she caught sight of something reflected against the white wall of the house.  An unexpected shadow had appeared in profile to her mother’s body.  There was a head, or what Wito assumed was a head, though it looked nothing like her mother’s, and had long, pointed teeth.  When her mother turned her head a little, the shadow moved, too.  Only when Wito had come a little closer did she finally make out what it was —  there, growing out of her mother’s back, was a huge, scaly lizard.

Self wrote this story when she was in the Stanford Creative Writing Program.  Would you believe, the story was driven by homesickness?

A long time ago, self used to know someone named Wito.  Now, no one she knows is called by that name.  Stay tuned, dear blog readers.  Stay tuned.

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