Sentence of the Day, CLOCKWORK PRINCE, p. 389

Self is still reading Mark Twain, but to Twain does not belong the Sentence of the Day (Is that even correct grammar, self? Something wrong with the construction, apparently. Nevertheless)

She has reached p. 453 of Clockwork Prince! And tomorrow she mails the book back to her niece in Calgary, who lent her a hardback collector’s edition. Thank you soooo soooo much, Karina, for introducing self to The Infernal Devices! (And oh by the way she’s still into Peeta Mellark, and she still writes Hunger Games Everlark fan fiction, and she’s also still in the Banff Writing Studio, but none of that matters now, because, because — now she has to reveal her Sentence of the Day!)

SPOILER ALERT MAJOR SPOILER ALERT DO NOT READ IF YOU HATE SPOILERS

The climax of Clockwork Prince is when Magnus Bane kisses Will Herondale.

Ooops — NOT!

Clockwork Prince is a really great novel. Self would have given it five stars if not for all those wasted scenes between taking-so-slow-to-die Jem Carstairs and that Silly Twit Tessa Gray.

There is no sentence like a Cassandra Clare sentence when she describes Will Herondale in action. Allow the slight digression, dear blog readers, but self will never forget that sentence on p. 446 of Clockwork Angel when Will was hurrying to save Tessa from the evil and lascivious clutches of a certain gentleman (This is Victorian London, after all! Did you perhaps think this was a Sarah Waters novel — BWAH. HA. HA!), and he has to ride bareback through the streets of 19th century London, and he has to take out his stele on a dead run, and he hits a locked door in the Institute, whereupon:

He slashed the stele across the door’s surface, creating the fastest Open rune of his life.

Now, in Clockwork Prince, tiresome Jem has broken a leg or something and is completely useless against a giant automaton and Tess’s dastardly brother Nate has been quite brutally slappiing Tess about, and only Will is left to protect Tess from an explosion set off by one of Henry’s infernal contraptions, and of course after it goes off Tess is all sad because her evil brother has died, and very belatedly she looks at Will and notices that he is lying very still because:

His gear had been shredded all along his spine and shoulder blades, the thick material torn by flying shards of razored metal.

EEEEK!!!

NOOOOOO!!!

So once again, Cassandra Clare has dug in the knife and self can’t even.

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

Enveloped in Snow, Trees and Stillness in Banff, Alberta

This week’s WordPress Photo Challenge is ENVELOPED.

What does “enveloped” mean to self? The weather, definitely. It is so different from what she’s used to in California.

These pictures are from last week. It was super-cold then. This first picture was near the Hoodoo Trail, which was closed for a few days because an elk carcass was attracting Grizzlies. Shivers!

Somewhere near the Hoodoo Trail

Somewhere Near the Hoodoo Trail

Sorry if this picture isn’t that clear. But she was taking the picture on the fly, from inside a van. It was snowing, as you can see.

First Elk Sighting -- EVER!

First Elk Sighting — EVER!

Sorry if this is a repeat of last week's elk sighting. Something about the snow adds immeasurably to the viewing experience, in self's humble opinion.

Sorry if this is a repeat of last week’s elk sighting. Something about the snow adds immeasurably to the viewing experience, in self’s humble opinion.

Enveloped: WordPress Daily Post Photo Challenge

This week’s WordPress Photo Challenge is ENVELOPED.

Self thought of fog first, so here are the Canadian Rockies as they appeared yesterday afternoon (In contrast, the weather today is all sun), and the last picture is of fellow writer Jami Macarty doing the interactive installation TouchMe by the artist duo Blendid. You press something on the touch-sensitive screen and it takes a picture, which then runs on an endless loop. Cool! So, there’s the silhouette of Jami, enveloped in light as the screen starts to photograph her.

The Weather Yesterday Afternoon

The Weather Yesterday Afternoon

More of the Fog-Shrouded Yesterday Afternoon

More of the Fog-Shrouded Yesterday Afternoon

Poet Jami Macarty Doing the Interactive Installation in the Lobby of Sally Benson Bldg. in the Banff Centre

Poet Jami Macarty Doing the Interactive Installation in the Lobby of Sally Benson Bldg. in the Banff Centre

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

FOLLOWING THE EQUATOR: New South Wales

And self is back to reading Twain.

She’s on Chapter X of Following the Equator:  “Some Barbarous English Laws.”

The opening quote is: “Everything human is pathetic. The secret source of humor itself is not joy but sorrow. There is no humor in heaven.” (Pudd’nhead Wilson)

Twain lets his indignation/sarcasm go flat out in this chapter. The excerpt below is probably his mildest in this section:

When the colony was about eighteen or twenty years old it was discovered that the land was specially fitted for the wool culture. Prosperity followed, commerce with the world began, by and by rich mines of the noble metal were opened, immigrants flowed in, capital likewise. The result is the great and wealthy and enlightened commonwealth of New South Wales.

It is a country that is rich in mines, wool ranches, trams, railways, steamship lines, schools, newspapers, botanical gardens, art-galleries, libraries, museums, hospitals, learned societies; it is the hospitable home of every species of material enterprise, and there is a church at every man’s door, and a race-track over the way.

Twain’s next stop was Australia, where he was to spend three-and-a-half months.

(Self still going to be quoting from Clockwork Angel. She’s just alternating between the Twain and that)

Stay tuned.

Forces of Nature: WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge

This week’s WordPress Photo Challenge is FORCES OF NATURE.

Woot Hoot! Self has many pictures that fit the theme this week. Because it just so happens she is in Banff, Alberta, participating in the Banff Literary Centre’s annual Writing Studio (with 23 other writers)

Last Wednesday, she signed up for a tour called “Banff Hot Spots” (only 5 Canadian) which turned out to be a very ironic title for the tour, as it snowed. And snowed. And snowed.

But, as the tour van was barreling along the Trans-Canada Highway, what should we encounter but a herd of elk, meandering by the side of the road. Serendipity, much?

A Surprise Encounter

A Surprise Encounter

The tour stopped at one of the Vermillion Lakes:

Vermillion Lake

Vermillion Lake

Overcast, snowing, freezing, but hey, at least self got these fabulous shots!

Vermillion Lake, From Another Angle

Vermillion Lake, From Another Angle

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

Labor Traffic, Queensland, 1884, as Described to Mark Twain by Rev. Gray

A vessel anchored just out of sight of our station, word was  brought to me that some boys were stolen, and the relatives wished me to go and get them back. The facts were, as I found, that six boys had recruited, had rushed into the boat, the Government Agent informed me. They had all “signed”; and, said the Government Agent, “on board they shall remain.” I was assured that the six boys were of age and willing to go. Yet on getting ready to leave the ship, I found four of the lads ready to come ashore in the boat! This I forbade. One of them jumped into the water and persisted in coming ashore in my boat. When appealed to, the Government agent suggested that we go and leave him to be picked up by the ship’s boat, a quarter-mile distant at the time.

When a boy jumps overboard, we just take a boat and pull ahead of him, then lie between him and the shore. If he has not tired himself swimming, and passes the boat, keep on heading him in this way.

— Mark Twain, Following the Equator, Chapter VI

Intricate: WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge

This week’s WordPress Photo Challenge is INTRICATE.

The prompt is from Krista, who gave as her inspiration the Palace of the Alhambra in Granada, Spain.

Here are a few of self’s pictures of intricacy:

Llorona, a print by Alicia Reyes McNamara

Llorona, a print by former Mendocino Art Center Artist-in-Residence Alicia Reyes McNamara

Ceiling of the cathedral of Christ Church, in Oxford, England, May 2014

Ceiling of the cathedral of Christ Church, in Oxford, England, which self saw for the first time in May 2014

More of Christ Church in Oxford, England

The stained glass windows in Christ Church are a wonder to behold.

Each of the subjects is a work of art. As for the pictures of Christ Church, they bring back a host of memories. Self had gone to Oxford to attend the 2014 Saboteur Awards announcement of their literary award winners. Self was able to meet up with poet Jenny Lewis, who self first met during an artists residency in Hawthornden in 2012, and who teaches at Oxford. It was great to see her!

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

Arrow Meets Aswang in Denis Johnson’s Novel TREE OF SMOKE

Aswang stories sound different when told by an American novelist. Read on:

He gave the lad a quiver of arrows and a very strong bow and charged him to stay all night in the granary at the bottom of the path, because there he would slay the aswang.  Many cats gathered in the granary at night, one of whom was in fact the aswang, who assumed this form in order to camouflage. ‘But, sir, how will I know the aswang, because you haven’t given me arrows to shoot every cat?’ And Saint Gabriel said, ‘The aswang will not play with its rat when it catches one, it only tears the rat in pieces intantly and revels in its blood. When you see a cat do that, you must shoot him right away, because that one is the aswang. Of course, if you fail, I don’t have to inform you you’re going to feel yourself being torn apart by the fangs of the aswang, and it will drink your blood as you die.’

— p. 51, Denis Johnson’s Tree of Smoke (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2007)

Very, very interesting. Self realizes she would rather read more about aswang than about Edward Lansdale. Stay tuned.

Early Bird 4: Window Life

Windows fascinate, as always.

Windows fascinate, as always.

Maybe because they're the first things she sees when she opens her eyes in the morning.

Maybe because they’re the first things she sees when she opens her eyes in the morning.

The early morning light is reflected on these hanging pictures.

The early morning light is reflected on these hanging pictures.

And that is all self has to say on the subject of windows.

Stay tuned.

Afloat 6: Butterflies and Birds

One day last year, self trekked to Golden Gate Park to see an exhibit at the de Young, then stopped by the Conservatory of Flowers to look at the Butterfly habitat:

DSCN4040

Golden Gate Park, Strybing Arboretum, and the Conservatory of Flowers are some of her favorite places to visit.

Not sure what this is. Could be a moth, could be a butterfly.

Not sure what this is. Could be a moth, could be a butterfly.

About a year ago, self went to the Los Angeles County Natural History Museum and strolled about the grounds. She was entranced by the flocks of birds on the bird feeders.

On the Grounds of the Los Angeles County Natural History Museum

On the Grounds of the Los Angeles County Natural History Museum

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

« Older entries

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,566 other followers