Book List From the Hay (Wales) Festival of Literature

Self is obssessed with book lists. Obssessed!

Found this list today, on the Hay Festival of Literature website. Copying it out below.

No list is not without its shortcomings: WHY ONLY THREE BOOKS BY ASIAN WOMEN.

The highlighted titles are the ones self has read:

  1. A Book of Mediterranean Food, by Elizabeth David
  2. A Girl is a Half-Formed Thing, by Eimear McBride
  3. A Place of Greater Safety, by Hilary Mantel
  4. Ain’t I a Woman, by Bell Hooks
  5. Ariel, by Sylvia Plath
  6. At the Source, by Gillian Clarke
  7. Babette’s Feast, by Isaak Dinesen
  8. Bad Behavior, by Mary Gaitskill
  9. The Bastard of Istanbul, by Elif Shafak
  10. Beloved, by Toni Morrison
  11. Bonjour Tristesse, by Francoise Sagan
  12. Brick Lane, by Monica Ali
  13. Bridget Jones’s Diary, by Helen Fielding
  14. Close Range: Wyoming Stories, by E. Annie Proulx
  15. Cold Comfort Farm, by Stella Gibbons
  16. Dept. of Speculation, by Jenny Offill
  17. The Collected Dorothy Parker
  18. Everyday Sexism, by Laura Bates
  19. Falling Awake, by Alice Oswald
  20. Frost in May, by Antonia White
  21. Gilead, by Marilynne Robinson
  22. Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn
  23. Gone With the Wind, by Margaret Mitchell
  24. Half of a Yellow Sun, by Chimamanda Ngozi
  25. Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azbakan, by J. K. Rowling
  26. Headscarves and Hymens: Why the Middle East Needs a Revolution, by Mona Eltahawy
  27. Heartburn, by Nora Ephron
  28. Henry and June, by Anais Nin
  29. Homegoing, by Yaa Gyasi
  30. How To Be a Woman, by Caitlin Moran
  31. How To Eat, by Nigella Lawson
  32. How We Survived Communism and Even Laughed, by Slavenka Drakulic
  33. I Capture the Castle, by Dodie Smith
  34. I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, by Maya Angelou
  35. Into That Darkness, by Gitta Sereny
  36. Like Water for Chocolate, by Laura Esquivel
  37. Lullaby, by Leila Slimani
  38. Mrs. Palfrey at the Claremont, by Elizabeth Taylor
  39. My Brilliant Friend, by Elena Ferrante
  40. Notes on a Scandal, by Zoe Heller
  41. Noughts & Crosses, by Malorie Blackman
  42. Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit, by Jeanette Winterson
  43. Orlando, by Virginia Woolf
  44. Persepolis, by Marjane Satrapi
  45. Pippi Longstocking, by Astrid Lindgren
  46. Possession, by A. S. Byatt
  47. Rachel’s Holiday, by Marian Keyes
  48. Rebecca, by Daphne du Maurier
  49. Regeneration, by Pat Barker
  50. Selected Stories by Alice Munro
  51. Small Island, by Andrea Levy
  52. Standing Female Nude, by Carol Ann Duffy
  53. Stranger on a Train, by Patricia Highsmith
  54. Testament of Youth, by Vera Brittain
  55. The Argonauts, by Maggie Nelson
  56. The Body in the Library, by Agatha Christie
  57. The Color Purple, by Alice Walker
  58. The Country Girls, by Edna O’Brien
  59. The Crusades: Islamic Perspectives, by Carole Hillenbrand
  60. The Diary of a Young Girl, by Anne Frank
  61. The Female Eunuch, by Germaine Greer
  62. The Feminine Mystique, by Betty Friedan
  63. The Fountain Overflows, by Rebecca West
  64. The Glass Castle, by Jeannette Walls
  65. The God of Small Things, by Arundhati Roy
  66. The Golden Notebook, by Doris Lessing
  67. The Gruffalo, by Julia Donaldson
  68. The Handmaid’s Tale, by Margaret Atwood
  69. The Haunting of Hill House, by Shirley Jackson
  70. The House of the Spirits, by Isabel Allende
  71. The Human Condition, by Hannah Arendt
  72. The Illustrated Mum, by Jacqueline Wilson
  73. The Land of Green Plums, by Herta Muller
  74. The Left Hand of Darkness, by Ursula K. Le Guin
  75. The Moomins and the Great Flood, by Tove Jansson
  76. The Passion According to G. H., by Clarice Lispector
  77. The Poisonwood Bible, by Barbara Kingsolver
  78. The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie, by Muriel Spark
  79. The Pursuit of Love, by Nancy Mitford
  80. The Road Home, by Rose Tremain
  81. The Second Sex, by Simone de Beauvoir
  82. The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole Aged 13 3/4, by Sue Townsend
  83. The Secret History, by Donna Tartt
  84. The Shock Doctrine, by Naomi Klein
  85. The View From the Ground, by Martha Gellhorn
  86. The Year of Magical Thinking, by Joan Didion
  87. Their Eyes Were Watching God, by Zora Neale Hurston
  88. Three Strong Women, by Marie Ndiaye
  89. Tipping the Velvet, by Sarah Waters
  90. To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee
  91. Train to Nowhere, by Anita Leslie
  92. Under the Net, by Iris Murdoch
  93. Unless, by Carol Shields
  94. We Need To Talk About Kevin, by Lionel Shriver
  95. What I Loved by Siri Huvstedt
  96. White Teeth, by Zadie Smith
  97. Wide Sargasso Sea, by Jean Rhys
  98. Wild Swans: Three Daughters of China, by Jung Chang
  99. Wise Children, by Angela Carter
  100. Women & Power, by Mary Beard

What’s Available in The Only Bookstore in Redwood City, CA

Self is reviewing her reading list. Really, it’s become almost an obsession. She goes into the closest bookstore to her house, the Barnes & Noble in Sequoia Station, and out of a list of 22 book titles (novels published 2017), she found just these three:

  • As Lie Is to Grin, by Simeon Marsalis
  • Lincoln in the Bardo, by George Saunders
  • Mikhail and Margarita, by Julie Lekstrom Himes

She doesn’t wish to knock her neighborhood Barnes & Noble because it really is a good store, with a better-than-average fiction section. Anyhoo, congratulations to authors Marsalis, Saunders and Himes for having their books in the store.

BTW, an island book which was recently published and which self highly recommends is Lillian Howan’s The Charm Buyers, set in Tahiti. She read it when it was first published last year and it is just the most luscious thing.

A week ago, self went back to her B & N, toting along a list of 60 titles, all recommended by her fellow Hawthornden writers in June 2012 (She found this list again just a few weeks ago; it was stuck in a drawer), and all she found in the store were these:

  • The Things They Carried and The Lake in the Woods, by Tim O’Brien
  • Travels With Charley, by John Steinbeck
  • The Crimson Petal and the White, by Michael Faber
  • Olive Kitteridge, by Elizabeth Strout

Granted, the Hawthornden list is made up of books at least several years old.

When she was last in Mendocino, she took her list of Island Books to Gallery Bookshop in Mendocino, and the salesperson, a very nice young man, told her: “With all due respect, these books are pretty old.” (I’d say! For example, these titles: To the Lighthouse, by Virginia Woolf, published 1927; The Fish Can Sing, by Halldor Laxness, published 1957; A House For Mr. Biswas, by V. S. Naipaul; published ___ decades ago?; Greenvoe, by George Mackay Brown, published 1972)

She found Emily Wilson’s translation of The Odyssey and when she was paying for it, she kept telling the bookstore person who rang up the sale: This is a very good book! Why do you only have one copy?

And the beleaguered staff person had to say: Well, we don’t normally have people come in from the street asking for The Odyssey.

Poor guy! Self didn’t mean to be so insistent but she is absolutely relentless in her quest for the Holy Grail — er, for the books on her list!

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

 

 

Hermes: The Odyssey, Book 5

Self is so glad she read The Mandibles: A Family, 2029-2047 and The Book of Dust, vol. 1 and His Dark Materials before reading The Odyssey. Her reading journey thus far in 2018 feels like the longest stretch of excellent fantasy she’s read in a loooong time (and she’s now at the very root, so it feels as if she’s been moving backwards through literary history. After this, she tackles Thomas More’s Utopia, which is also fantasy. Well, fantasy and philosophy).

Shape-shifting moments thus far: In one scene, Athena turns into an ossifrage right before the disbelieving eyes of Menelaus, and in another she sends a phantom in the shape of a woman to enter the house of Odysseus and comfort Penelope while she sleeps.

Book Five is probably going to be important. She loves the title: From the Goddess to the Storm.

Finally, we meet Hermes, the messenger-god:

He touched Pieria, then from the sky
he plunged into the sea and swooped between
the waves, just like a seagull catching fish,
wetting its whirring wings in tireless brine.

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

 

Adding to the Reading List: A Process

Self is back home in Redwood City, California. About a mile from her house is a Barnes & Noble (in the Sequoia Station shopping center). She spent about an hour in there today, updating her reading list (The list is her ne plus ultra, her be-all and end-all, her secret game plan, and her whole raison d’etre as a writer).

She’s newly arrived from Mendocino, California (which has a pretty fabulous bookstore: Gallery Bookshop on Main Street), and her first stop is, of course, a bookstore.

Gallery Bookshop had on hand: The Old Man and the Sea (Ernest Hemingway); Lord of the Flies (William Golding); Wide Sargasso Sea (Jean Rhys); The Emily Wilson translation of The Odyssey (Homer); Utopia (Thomas More); As Lie Is to Grin (Simeon Marsalis); Lincoln in the Bardo (George Saunders); Mikhail and Margarita (Julie Lekstrom Himes); and The Summer Book, by Finnish writer Tove Jansson.

This afternoon, in her Redwood City Barnes & Noble, self went in with a long list of about 20 authors who published novels in 2017. She found two of the 20. She moved on to her next list, the list of books recommended by her fellow writers in Hawthornden, Scotland, June 2012. She struck out on all the names on p. 1 (The list is three pages long, single-spaced), except for Tim O’Brien, all of whose books are available in-store. She was kinda hoping it wouldn’t be O’Brien because his books, though very well written, are depressing. Self asked if they had any of Tamar Yoseloff’s poetry collections, but they did not.

So that’s what her reading list looks like for the remainder of 2018. She doesn’t think anything can top Philip Pullman, though. She was such a mess yesterday that a fellow fan fiction writer had to reach out and say, about The Amber Spyglass: It is safe to read “mid-way on p. 419 to 420. Then put the book away forever.”

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

 

In Honor of Independent Bookstore Day, 28 April 2018: Novelist Lillian Howan Lists Her Favorite Books

Lillian Howan is the author of the recently published novel, The Charm Buyers. (University of Hawai’i Press, 2017).  She spent her early childhood in Tahiti and later graduated from the University of California, Berkeley, School of Law. She is the editor of Wakako Yamauchi’s collection, Rosebud and Other Stories (University of Hawai‘i Press, 2011). Her writings have been published in the Asian American Literary Review, Café Irreal, Calyx, New England Review, Vice Versa, and the anthologies Ms Aligned 2 and Under Western Eyes. Lillian will be reading as part of the Ms. Aligned 2 panel at the Hawai’i Book and Music Festival on Sunday, May 6, at 11 am.Da22aPwU0AEXI99About her list, Lillian says:

  • This list of my recommended books is incomplete in the interest of space – I apologize for any omissions! I’d gladly send a list of 500 recommended books by women authors and poets.
Headshot2

Lillian Howan, Author of The Charm Buyers

FICTION

Green Island, Shawna Yang Ryan
Home, Marilynne Robinson
Island of Shattered Dreams, Chantal Spitz
Love Medicine, Louise Erdrich

Steelies and Other Endangered Species, Rebecca Lawton
Swimming in Hong Kong, Stephanie Han
The Collected Stories of Lydia Davis, Lydia Davis
The Complete Stories, Clarice Lispector
The Country of the Pointed Firs,
Sarah Orne Jewett
The Lost Language, Marianne Villanueva
Wide Sargasso Sea, Jean Rhys (the 2016 edition features an excellent introduction by Edwidge Danticat)
Women Without Men,
Shahrnush Parsipur

GRAPHIC NOVEL

The Best We Could Do: An Illustrated Memoir, Thi Bui

POETRY

Conjugated Visits, Diane Kirsten Martin
Dream City, Karen Carissimo
Invisible Gifts, Maw Shein Win
Power Made Us Swoon, Brynn Saito
She Had Some Horses, Joy Harjo
The Collected Poems of Lucille Clifton, Lucille Clifton
The Complete Poems, Anne Sexton
The Darkened Temple, Mari L’Esperance
This House, My Bones, Elmaz Abinader

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

In Honor of Independent Bookstore Day 28 April 2018: Poet Anne-Adele Wight Lists Her Favorites

What a universe of riches is contained in a writer’s list of recommended books. This is the second article self has posted in honor of Independent Bookstore Day 2018. Everyone who wants to do something special for the day, take a look at Anne-Adele’s books below, then go to your nearest independent bookstore and inquire if they have a copy in-store. If they don’t, ask them to order. It only takes a few days!

DSCN0948

T-Shirt Features a Quote from Shakespeare: “These violent delights have violent ends.”

Anne-Adele Wight is the author of the poetry collections The Age of Greenhouses, Sidestep Catapult and Opera House Arterial, which she describes as “a surreal trickster mythology.” An interview of her can be found on her publisher’s website: BlazeVOX. Her background includes literature, archaeology, and technical communication. She performs widely and has sponsored many events in her home city of Philadelphia.

Here is how she explains the genesis of Opera House Arterial:

In 1983 a friend showed me a postcard she’d received from Quito, Ecuador, the home of a well-known nineteenth-century opera house, El Teatro Nacional. The postcard showed the opera house as something etheral, not quite connected to the ground, because a row of buildings hid the lowest part. Behind it the Andes rose high into the air, looking unearthly. I felt something strike into my brain and know I had to write a poem, but where to begin? I put the opera house aside for many years; it finally surfaced when it was ready. I realized I had not one poem, but many, and started writing. Before long I had a book, Opera House Arterial, and a mythical character, my trickster opera house.

Without further ado, Anne-Adele’s list of recommended books:

 POETRY
  • Sandra Beasley, Count the Waves
  • Sarah Blake, Let’s Not Live on Earth
  • Travis Cebula and Sarah Suzor, After the Fox
  • CAConrad, While Standing in Line for Death
  • Lucas de Lima, Wetland
  • Ryan Eckes, Valu-Plus
  • Lisa A. Flowers, diatomhero: religious poems
  • Geoffrey Gatza, A Dog Lost in the Brick City of Outlawed Trees
  • Sueyeun Juliette Lee, Solar Maximum
  • Lynn Levin,  Miss Plastique
  • Jane Lewty, In One Form to Find Another
  • Jenn McCreary, Ab Ovo
  • MaryAnn L. Miller, Cures for Hysteria
  • Debrah Morkun, Projection Machine
  • Eileen Myles, I Must Be Living Twice
  • Gabriel Ojeda-Sagué, Jazzercise is a Language
  • Raquel Salas Rivera, lo tercario / tertiary
  • Amy Small-McKinney, Walking toward Cranes
  • Nicole Steinberg, Glass Actress
  • Brian Teare, The Empty Form Goes All the Way to Heaven
  • Divya Victor, Things to Do with Your Mouth
  • Anne Waldman, Manatee / Humanity

FICTION

  • Isabel Allende, Daughter of Fortune
  • Ann Arensberg, Incubus
  • Margaret Atwood, Moral Disorder
  • Margaret Atwood, Stone Mattress
  • Robertson Davies, The Deptford Trilogy
  • Margaret Drabble, The Red Queen
  • Ursula K. LeGuin, The Left Hand of Darkness
  • Doris Lessing, The Grandmothers
  • Eileen Myles, Chelsea Girls
  • Jean Rhys, Wide Sargasso Sea
  • Jean Rhys, Good Morning, Midnight
  • Isaac Bashevis Singer, The Manor
  • Jacqueline Woodson, Another Brooklyn
  • Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway
  • Markus Zusak, The Book Thief

NONFICTION & GENRE-DEFYING

  • Atul Gawande, Mortal
  • David Harrison, The Last Speakers: A Quest to Save the World’s Most Endangered Languages
  • Walter Isaacson, Steve Jobs
  • Gina Kolata, Flu
  • Jon Krakauer, Under the Banner of Heaven
  • Kelcey Parker Ervick, The Bitter Life of Božena Němcova
  • Rebecca Skloot, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks
  • Virginia Woolf, A Room of One’s Own

Now, get on over to your local independent bookstore!

Stay tuned.

 

In Honor of Independent Bookstore Day, Saturday, 28 April 2018: LUISA IGLORIA PICKS SOME GOOD ONES

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Luisa Igloria, Poet

Since self is currently Writer-in-Residence at the Mendocino Art Center, this week she’s been writing up a storm (also sending out her work) and adding to her reading list with regular drop-ins to one of the best bookstores in the world: Gallery  Bookshop in Mendocino. Yelp gives them five stars!

She also asked two fabulous writers if they could share their list of Recommended Books with her, and she was so happy when they agreed. (Even if your local indie doesn’t carry the titles, they can always order them. In most cases, they’ll take an average of three or four days to get to the bookstore)

First up, Luisa Igloria

Luisa A. Igloria is the winner of the 2015 Resurgence Prize (UK), the world’s first major award for ecopoetry, selected by former UK poet laureate Sir Andrew Motion, Alice Oswald, and Jo Shapcott. Her latest works include the collection The Buddha Wonders If She Is Having a Mid-Life Crisis (Phoenicia Publishing, Montreal, 2018), the chapbooks Haori (Tea & Tattered Pages Press, 2017), Check & Balance (Moria Press/Locofo Chaps, 2017), and Bright as Mirrors Left in the Grass (Kudzu House Press eChapbook selection for Spring 2015). Her collection Ode to the Heart Smaller than a Pencil Eraser was selected by Mark Doty for the 2014 May Swenson Prize and published by Utah State University Press. Her other collections are: Night Willow (Phoenicia Publishing, Montreal, 2014), The Saints of Streets (University of Santo Tomas Publishing House, 2013), Juan Luna’s Revolver (2009 Ernest Sandeen Prize, University of Notre Dame Press). She teaches on the faculty of the MFA Creative Writing Program at Old Dominion University, which she directed from 2009-2015. Her website is www.luisaigloria.com

Luisa’s Poetry Recommendations:

  • Afterland, Mai Der Vang
  • Calling a Wolf a Wolf, Kaveh Akbar
  • Carpathia, Cecilia Woloch
  • Catalog of Unabashed Gratitude, Ross Gay
  • Chord, Rick Barot
  • Eye Level, Jenny Xie
  • Glasshouses, Lighthouses, Tung-hui Hu
  • Khaty Xiong, Poor Anima, Khaty Xiong
  • Living Quarters, Adrienne Su
  • Night Sky With Exit Wounds, Ocean Vuong
  • Some Say the Lark, Jennifer Chang
  • Stereo. Island. Mosaic., Vincent Toro
  • Registers of Illuminated Villages, Tarfia Faizullah
  • The Second O of Sorrow, Sean Thomas Dougherty
  • When I Grow Up I Want to be a List of Further Possibilities, Chen Chen
  • Whereas, Layli Long Soldier

Luisa’s Fiction Recommendations:

  • A Tale for the Time Being, Ruth Ozeki
  • America is Not the Heart, Elaine Castillo
  • Bel Canto, Ann Patchett
  • But For the Lovers, Wilfrido Nolledo
  • Heart of Darkness, Joseph Conrad
  • Mayor of the Roses, Marianne Villanueva
  • Pachinko, Min Jin Lee
  • Smaller and Smaller Circles, F.H. Batacan
  • The Last Mistress of Jose Rizal, Brian Roley
  • The Sympathizer, Viet Thanh Nguyen
  • The Vagrants, Yiyun Li
  • Too Much Happiness, Alice Munro
  • To the Lighthouse, Virginia Woolf
  • Valiant Gentlemen, Sabina Murray

Luisa’s Nonfiction/Hybrid Recommendations:

  • 100 Demons, Lynda Barry
  • America is in the Heart, Carlos Bulosan
  • Blind Spot, Teju Cole
  • Echolalia in Script, Sam Roxas-Chua 姚
  • Kilometer Zero, Wilfredo Pascual, Jr.
  • On Imagination, Mary Ruefle
  • Silver Road, Kazim Ali
  • The Dark Interval, Rainer Maria Rilke
  • The Kepel Fruit, Tung-hui Hu
  • Too Much and Not the Mood, Durga Chew-Bose
  • Woman Warrior, Maxine Hong Kingston

Self doesn’t know about you, but she’s itchy to get at more than a few of these books!

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

 

Reading List 2018: Update

Moving so slowly through The Subtle Knife but someone tweeted about the end and self was so upset that she’s picking up the pace to get it over with.

There are years that stand out in her memory for being particularly rich and focused.

For example, the year she went on a memoir binge and read nothing but memoirs.

Then, the year she only read translations.

Then, the year she only read books written by women.

Then, not too long ago, the year she only read travel books.

Then one summer, she only read Henning Mankell. She read seven of his books one after the other.

It’s with no small surprise that self looks back at the books she’s read so far 2018 and finds that her favorites have been novels. Because she hasn’t been able to enter the required headspace to appreciate a good novel for a very long time.

Here are the novels she’s read so far this year: Moshi Moshi, Conclave, The Mandibles: A Family, La Belle Sauvage, The Golden Compass

And they’ve all been really good!

After she finishes reading The Subtle Knife, she’ll read the last book in Pullman’s His Dark Materials trilogy, The Amber Spyglass.

Then she’ll move through some novels she read in her childhood: Treasure Island, The Old Man and the Sea, Lord of the Flies, Wide Sargasso Sea. (This shouldn’t take long, most are very short. More like novellas, really)

Finally, she compiled a list of 20 novels published 2017. She tried to stick to small presses. Avoiding blockbusters at all cost. Reading through that list will probably get her through 2018.

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

Four Weeks In Hawthornden, Scotland, June 2012

The benefactress Drue Heinz passed away recently, and there was outpouring of sadness from all Hawthornden alums. The impact she had on writers around the world was amazing.

June 2012, self availed of one of Ms. Heinz’s enduring legacies: the Hawthornden Retreat for Writers, near Edinburgh (40 minutes by public bus from). Four wonderful weeks, with five other writers: Allison Amend, Richard Lemm, Jenny Lewis, Marylee McDonald, and Joan McGavin.

One of us volunteered to write down every book recommendation, every movie recommendation, every poem recommendation, every television series recommendation and every short story recommendation. Self completely forgot about this list, until today.

She’s going through her house in Redwood City, inch by inch. At the back of a drawer, she pulled out this list. She didn’t have time to look at it in Redwood City, which must be why she brought it with her to Mendocino. Here are some of the book recommendations (The list is three pages long, double-sided. Self has no time)

FANTASY

  • Guy Gavriel Kay: The Fionavar Tapestry

MEMOIR

  • John Steinbeck: Travels with Charlie

NONFICTION

  • Jim Rosenberger: High Steel

NOVELS

  • Bhira Backhaus: Under the Lemon Trees
  • John Banville: Doctor Copernicus
  • Andrea Barrett: The Voyage of the Narwhal
  • Joseph Boyden: Three Day Road
  • Michael Byers: Percival’s Planet
  • Sarah Shun-lien Bynum: The Ms. Hempel Chronicles
  • Michael Crummey: Galore
  • Richard Flanagan: Wanting and Death of a River Guide
  • Katherine Govier: Angel Walk
  • Eleanor Henderson: Ten Thousand Saints
  • Guy Gavriel Kay: Under Heaven
  • Larry McMurtry: Hud
  • Howard Norman: The Bird Artist
  • Marge Piercy: Gone to Soldiers
  • John Steffler: The Afterlife of George Cartwright
  • Elizabeth Strout: Abide With Me and Olive Kitteridge
  • Rosemary Sutcliffe: The Eagle of the Ninth
  • Adam Thorpe: Ulverton
  • Sigrid Undset: Kristin Lavransdatter

NOVELLAS

  • Josh Weil: The New Valley (3 novellas)

POETRY

  • Tamar Yoseloff: The City With Horns

SHORT STORY COLLECTIONS

  • Andrea Barrett: Ship Fever
  • Evgenia Citkowitz (Hawthornden Alum): Ether: Seven Stories and a Novella
  • Michael Faber: The Apple: Crimson Petal Stories and The Fahrenheit Twins
  • Tim O’Brien: Going After Cacciato, The Things They Carried, The Lake in the Woods
  • Tobias Wolff: In the Garden of the North American Martyrs

Sentence of the Day: THE SUBTLE KNIFE, p. 2

So here it is, 2018, the year self decided to barrel through all of Philip Pullman.

Working in strict chronological order (if not in book publication order), she started with La Belle Sauvage, Vol. One of The Book of Dust, the prequel trilogy to His Dark Materials.

Five Stars!

She just finished The Golden Compass.

Four Stars!

She just began The Subtle Knife.

p. 2, Will Parry talking about his mother to his former piano teacher:

  • “She just needs someone to be kind to her, and I think you could do that quite easily, probably.”

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

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