Thursday Trios

This challenge is hosted by Mama Cormier. Every Thursday, you post a picture of a trio.

Self knows, it is Monday today. Nevertheless.

  • Bath, England 2017
  • Self’s three contributor copies of The Cost of Paper, published by 1888 Center in Orange, CA
  • A trio of Mike Byrne ceramics, at an exhibit in Dublin Castle, May 2019
  • Alan Meredith’s ebonised wood triptych, at the same exhibit in Dublin Castle, May 2019

Searching for trios can be quite addictive!

Stay safe, dear blog readers. Stay safe.

Setting in EDDIE’S BOY

Eddie’s Boy opens in Bath! That’s Jane Austen country! Of all the bloody cheek.

It seems Eddie the hitman’s settled down with a member of the British royalty! Whose family has owned a house on the Royal Crescent for hundreds of years. Every May, the couple abandon Bath (because that’s when all the American students pour into town — oh, the horror!) for the more sedate charms of a country manor outside York.

Lord, what a ride this is going to be!

Self loves Bath. She was there once, in 2017. The Royal Crescent is, rightly, a World Heritage sight. Self is mighty entertained at the notion that one of those fabulous Georgian townhouses is the abode of an American hitman and his lordly wife.

Stay safe, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

Catherine Morland: Northanger Abbey, p. 26

With more than usual eagerness did Catherine hasten to the Pump-room the next day, secure within herself of seeing Mr. Tilney there before the morning were over, and ready to meet him with a smile: — but no smile was demanded — Mr. Tilney did not appear.

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Jane Austen Centre, Bath, May 2017

Too. Funny.

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

 

 

Northanger Abbey, p. 24

This is a 2nd reading, and great is her reward, as she really lingers over the story now, and sometimes even bursts into laughter in public, so much so that, this afternoon, an American woman in a party of four just had to break briefly from her companions and ask self what it was she was reading that made her laugh so much. When self showed her the book cover, she seemed a little taken aback.

Catherine Morland and Henry Tilney have just met. Tilney is a clergyman. Not as exciting as being a Captain in HRM’s navy, but Tilney is way more flirty thatn Captain Wentworth, and Catherine is much livelier than Anne Elliot (perhaps because she is 18 and not a spinster of 27!) therefore twice as much fun.

They danced again; and, when the assembly closed, parted, on the lady’s side at least, with a strong inclination for continuing the acquaintance. Whether she thought of him so much, while she drank her warm wine and water, and prepared herself for bed, as to dream of him when there, cannot be ascertained; but I hope it was no more than in a slight slumber, or a morning doze at most; for if it be true, as a celebrated writer has maintained, that no young lady can be justified in falling in love before the gentleman’s love is declared, it must be very improper that a young lady should dream of a gentleman before the gentleman is first known to have dreamt of her.

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

 

“Safe in all worldly matters”

The above words from Mrs. Smith, Anne Elliot’s former governess, who has fallen on hard times. The fact that Mrs. Smith has been the person Anne has sought out in Bath, as a way to escape the pressure of society, the fact that she then reveals her wish to have Anne settled, comes as a disappointment.

The next part of the conversation, with Anne being so gracious and so cheerful (so — pardon me — dense) results in this:

Mrs. Smith: “He was not married when I knew him first.”

Anne: “And were you much acquainted?”

Mrs. Smith: “Intimately.”

Next: Mr. Elliott is the devil incarnate! It appears he married, purely for money, a woman whose “father was a grazier” and whose “grandfather had been a butcher.”

Stay tuned.

SCALE: The Daily Post Photo Challenge, 11 October 2017

Very interesting challenge from The Daily Post this week!

SCALE

Photography ” . . .  is all about perspective, where and how you place other objects in the frame . . . ” — Erica V., The Daily Post

Here are some examples of SCALE: (1) at the Louvre, in front of the Mona Lisa (2) in Bath’s Royal Crescent, the entrance to Royal Crescent # 1 and (3) in New York’s Russian Tea Room, next to Carnegie Hall. Self’s first trip to New York City was with Dearest Mum, who once played at Carnegie Hall. This September, she took Dearest Mum, who’s now past 80, for lunch at the Russian Tea Room. We had the best time.

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The Louvre, May 2017

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Royal Crescent No. 1 (Royal Crescent Museum), Bath

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The Russian Tea Room, 57th St., New York City (Next to Carnegie Hall): Dearest Mum took self here, her first time in New York City, decades ago. The place hasn’t changed a bit.

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

STRUCTURE: The Daily Post Photo Challenge, 30 August 2017

“This week, share with us the structure of something typically overlooked.”

— Jen H., The Daily Post

  • Bench facing a Clyfford Still, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art:

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Nice echoing of lines here.

  • Nice Arches! The artists complex at Allied Arts Guild, Menlo Park:

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  • Finally, a garden in Bath, one of the most beautiful cities in the world. Most of the residences are on a slope. To get to the city proper, you must descend.

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Stepped Terraces in a Backyard in Bath

Stay tuned dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

BATH: Magnificent Order

And self does mean magnificent.

The Royal Crescent in Bath takes her breath away. Even after seeing it for the third or fourth time.

The shape is an ellipsis cut in half. Who thought of this curved shape? So perfect. It’s almost mystical.

The architect (whose name self immediately forgot) was inspired, according to the guide on the walking tour, by the Roman Coliseum (which is itself elliptical. Really? Self never knew!)

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Royal Crescent

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Royal Crescent No. 1 (Royal Crescent Museum): Self is so happy that this woman came out of the entrance just as self was getting ready to take this shot.

Self had been on the Grand Parade, many times. But she never looked over the bridge to the river below. She finally did, yesterday, and — GAH! Rapids! Who would have thought?

Only after looking at the river for several moments did she realize that the gulls were walking on the edge of the top rapids. Grand illusion! And there are kayaks over there!

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The River Avon from the Grand Parade

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

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