Fourth From the Annaghmakerrig Book: Vona Groarke

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Excerpt from Maize, by Vona Groarke:

The Faber Castells ripen in your hand.
You’ve been drawing since breakfast:
sky after sky, face after face, but something
in yours says they’re not quite right.

Quote of the Day: Richard Brautigan

Karma Repair Kit: Items 1 – 4

  1. Get enough food to eat, and eat it.
  2. Find a place to sleep where it is quiet, and sleep there.
  3. Reduce intellectual activity and emotional noise until you arrive at the silence of yourself.
  4.  

 

 

 

Ursula K. Le Guin on Writing

The sound of the language is where it all begins. The test of a sentence is, Does it sound right? The basic elements of language are physical: the noise words make, the sounds and silences that make the rhythms marking their relationships. Both the meaning and the beauty of the writing depend on these sounds and rhythms. This is just as true of prose as it is of poetry, though the sound effects of prose are usually subtle and always irregular.

— from Steering the Craft: A 21st-Century Guide to Sailing the Sea of Story, by Ursula K. Le Guin

Another From Rinker Buck

Somewhere a few pages ago, Rinker Buck mentions that he is part Irish.

The Sentence of the Day is from The Oregon Trail: A New American Journey (Was reading this in Cork and the irony was rich: She was reading about of all things mules while listening to mostly cello music in a fabulous Irish city).

A rumination on the memory of Buck’s Dear Departed Dad:

Buck’s Dad: You’re not quitting. You just keep going . . .

Buck, years later: The idea that I could be doing quite a lot by not doing anything at all, just by not quitting, was quite beyond me at the time, but I did feel that night that I had the pioneer spirit.

Very wise, Mr. Buck.

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

The Fine Calibration of Favors: RUBICON, p. 140

There was a rich guy named Crassus and he just wanted to be Caesar, okay?

He was sort of a skinflint.

Reading Tom Holland’s Rubicon, self is reminded that only stupid people never grant any favors. People who refuse categorically to grant any favors are not only stupid, they’re thinking strictly short-term. The granting of favors pays off big time in the future. It’s called leverage.

Back to the reading for the day:

p. 140:

Crassus knew a Greek philosopher, Alexander, who occasionally came over to stay (Holland says the hospitality Crassus extended was “grudging”). Alexander “would be lent a cloak for journeys then required to give it back.” (No mention by Holland of how many times Alexander borrowed a cloak; after the first time, it would seem only natural for Alexander to provide himself with his own cloak: but no. Perhaps he was just as much of a skinflint as Crassus. And this guy was a philosopher).

Alexander was “Greek, and therefore did not have the vote. Had he been a citizen, then he would have been encouraged to borrow far more than a cloak. The more eminent his status, the more spectaculary he would have been encouraged to fall into debt.”

#Nice #pointsTomHolland

Advice for the Soldier Returning From Iraq

Don’t kill yourself. Don’t beat your wife.

— from the title story of Iraq War vet Phil Klay’s collection Redeployment

Fort William Henry, 1757

The Indians (thousands of them) allied with the French, who assigned each of the three largest tribes a chaplain: “Piquet for the Iroquois, Mathevet for the Nipissings . . . and Roubaud for the Abenakis.” (Montcalm and Wolfe, p. 336)

On the eve of a great battle between the British and the French, the Indians perform war dances and make sacrificial offerings to the Great Manitou, the God of War.

“This greatly embarrassed the three priests, who were about to say Mass, but doubted whether they ought to say it in presence of the sacrifice to the devil . . . ” whereupon Montcalm, their general, advised them: “Better say it so than not at all.” (p. 337)

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

#amreading: Advice for the Chronic Worrier, Elizabeth Bernstein, Wall Street Journal, 28 February 2017

For most people, worrying is a form of problem-solving where you look at challenges in the future and work them out before they happen, which can be constructive . . .  But some people worry too much. Chronic worriers fret all the time, about everything. Pathological worriers are chronic worriers whose apprehension affects their functioning.

— Elizabeth Bernstein (from “You’re A Worrier? Don’t Worry”, p. A13, Wall Street Journal)

First, ask yourself: Are you a “chronic worrier”? Here’s a list of things you can do to end “chronic worrying” and be happy

  1. Start with a reality check. Is the emotion you’re feeling equivalent in intensity to the situation you are worrying about? Usually the answer is no.
  2. Tell yourself a better story rather than focusing on the worst-case scenario. Not only will this help you feel less negative, you will free your mind up to find solutions to your problem.
  3. Make a plan. Write down in detail how you will deal with the situation. It will seem more controllable.
  4. Set a timer. Give yourself 15 minutes to worry as much as you want. Then stop.
  5. Yell “Shred!” (in your head). Picture your worries going through a paper shredder. Visualize them being destroyed.
  6. Distract yourself with music, exercise, a good book or movie. It is hard to focus on the negative when you’re enjoying yourself.

You’re welcome.

Stay tuned.

Against the Odds 2: Books and City Councils

An unexpected victory? A snapshot of an unlikely moment? This week, show us something that defies the odds. 

— Michelle W., The Daily Post

How about books to help you achieve your dreams?

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Books to Straighten Your Thinking in 2017

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Daly City Vice Mayor Juslyn Manalo: Filipinos make up a sizable portion of the Daly City population. They struggle against many odds.

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At the Most Recent Daly City Council Meeting, Feb. 13, these signs were held by members of the audience.

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

Quote of the Day: Andrew Marantz

What exactly is alt-right? Other than an inflammatory hashtag?

Here’s one definition. It’s in an essay called “Trolls for Trump,” by Andrew Marantz (The New Yorker, 31 October 2016):

a loose, on-line affiliation of white nationalists, neo-monarchists, masculinists, conspiracists, belligerent nihilists, and social media trolls. The alt-right has no consistent ideology; it is a label, like “snob” or “hipster,” that is often disavowed by people who exemplify it. The term typically applies to conservatives and reactionaries who are active on the Internet and too anti-establishment to feel at home in the Republican Party.

The essay then goes on to show how the alt-right is seeding social media with misinformation.

As if any thinking person didn’t know that already?

She never presses “like” anymore unless she’s vetted the tweeter. Whereas in the old days (pre-Nov. 8), she would just blithely follow back.

Then she’d discover — days, weeks, or even months later — that the person endorses the Muslim Ban and the Muslim Registry. And it fills her with so much shame.

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

 

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