The Snows of Kilimanjaro: SNARK

A direct quote from F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Diamond As Big as the Ritz appears below. Poor Julian indeed! Hemingway’s contempt is code. The ‘someone’ is probably Hemingway.

  • The rich were dull and they drank too much, or they played too much backgammon. They were dull and they were repetitious. He remembered poor Julian and his romantic awe of them and how he had started a story once that began, “The very rich are different from you and me.” And how someone had said to Julian, Yes, they have more money.

 

A Boucherie Chevaline: The Snows of Kilimanjaro, Pt 2

  • The golden horse’s head outside the Boucherie Chevaline where the carcasses hung yellow gold and red in the open window, and the green-painted cooperative where they bought their wine; good wine and cheap.

Also Still Writing, Ho Hey

To date, novel is 102,663 words (Before corona virus shelter in place, it was around 97k, essentially finished, but anyhoo. There shall be a sequel!)

From a scene between the Governor General of the Filipinas and self’s MC, Matias:

The Governor General smiled. “When I had not heard from you, I knew you must have found a way to keep yourself busy.”

They drank until it grew dark and the fireflies began to dance.

Stay tuned.

The Short Stories of Ernest Hemingway: The First Forty-Nine

Not reading in the order in which they appear in the book. Rather, starting with the stories Hemingway wrote while he was marching with The Fifth Column.

DSCN0042

There’s a date in self’s handwriting on the flyleaf: February 1984

Story # 1:  The Killers, p. 279

This story is about dinner.

“Everything we want’s the dinner, eh?”

“I can give you ham and eggs, bacon and eggs, liver — “

“I’ll take ham and eggs,” the man called.

“Give me bacon and eggs,” said the other man.

Which so does not sound like dinner to self, but anyhoo.

Stay tuned.

Over 100k Words, Keep Going

Added a new letter from the Governor General to Philip II (after whom the Philippines was named). Self’s main narrative is stuffed with about two dozen of the most circumlocutious letters!

To His Sacred Catholic Royal Majesty:

The Moros begin their yearly raids. They always coincide with the end of the monsoon.

Reading Gemino H. Abad

DSCN0047

The Nothing That Speaks:

The poems come thick and fast today. I cannot cope. Poem after poem, half-words — and without words still.

I hardly cope.


Gemino H. Abad is a poet, literary critic, historian and professor emeritus of literature and creative writing at the University of the Philippines. In 2009, he received Italy’s premiere literary award, the Rome Prize.

Poetry Saturday: Ernest Hemingway

We ate well and
cheaply and drank
well and cheaply
and slept well and
warm together and
loved each other

For Women’s History Month

March is Women’s History Month. These are the women (prose) authors on self’s 2020 Reading List:

  • Liane Moriarty
  • Diane Gabaldon
  • Edwidge Danticat
  • Mathangi Subramanian
  • Jacqueline Woodson
  • Jung Chang
  • Harriet Beecher Stowe
  • Sally Rooney
  • Peg Alford Pursell
  • Oyinkan Braithwaite
  • Dacia Maraini
  • Shahrnush Parsipoor
  • E. R. Ramzipoor
  • Elizabeth Tallent
  • Sadie Jones

Also: Caroline Kim-Brown’s short story collection, which won the Drue Heinz Literature Prize, coming this fall: The Prince of Mournful Thoughts. You can read the title story now, in Ms.Aligned Vol. 3.

Women self has read so far 2020:

  • Dodie Smith
  • Katherine Addison
  • Jia Tolentino
  • Kathryn Ferguson

BRIDESHEAD REVISITED opens with . . . war?

And here self was expecting a fantastically elegiac escape into the English countryside, but no . . .

When I reached ‘C’ Company lines, which were at the top of the hill, I paused and looked back at the camp, just coming into full view below me through the grey mist of early morning. We were leaving that day. When we marched in, three months before, the place was under snow; now the first leaves of spring were unfolding.

Another surprise was that it’s written in first person. So how is Waugh going to pull off writing erotic when his first person is stuffy English? Something happens, she does know that, lol

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

Quote of the Day: Evelyn Waugh, 1959

from the Preface to Brideshead Revisited:

  • It was impossible to foresee, in the spring of 1944, the present cult of the English country house. It seemed then that the ancestral seats which were our chief national artistic achievement were doomed to decay and spoliation like the monasteries in the sixteenth century. So I piled it on rather, with passionate sincerity.

He wrote the Preface in 1959 (Brideshead Revisited was written in 1944) and it’s even truer today, 60 years later.

Stay tuned.

« Older entries Newer entries »

John's Space .....

"Two roads diverged in a wood, and I— I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all the difference." The Road Not Taken, by Robert Frost

nancy merrill photography

capturing memories one moment at a time

Asian Cultural Experience

Preserving the history and legacy of Salinas Chinatown

Rantings Of A Third Kind

The Blog about everything and nothing and it's all done in the best possible taste!

Sauce Box

Never get lost in the Sauce

GK Dutta

Be One... Make One...

Cee's Photo Challenges

Teaching the art of composition for photography.

Fashion Not Fear

Fueling fearlessness through style and inspiration.

Wanderlust and Wonderment

My writing and photo journey of inspiration and discovery

transcribingmemory

Decades of her words.

John Oliver Mason

Observations about my life and the world around me.

Insanity at its best!

Yousuf Bawany's Blog

litadoolan

Any old world uncovered by new writing

unbolt me

the literary asylum

CSP Archives

Archive of the CSP

The 100 Greatest Books Challenge

A journey from one end of the bookshelf to the other

Random Storyteller

A crazy quilt of poems, stories, and humor by Catherine Hamrick