Sunday Stills, Halloween 2021 Edition: #eerie

Self loves the Halloween-themed photo challenges. The host of Sunday Stills, Second Wind Leisure Perspectives, has come up with the word EERIE.

Of course she has many images in her archives that she thinks will fit the bill.

A 17th c Plague Doctor (image from the book A Short History of Humanity, by Johannes Krause and Thomas Trappe)

Window Display, Spitalfields (East London): October 2019

The Little Girl from Horror Movie ‘The Grudge’, Courtesy of The Neighbor Around the Corner from Self

HAPPY HALLOWEEN!

WSJ Readers Respond to “President Trump Responds on Pennsylvania”

LETTER 1:

Although I can appreciate the value of your newsletter printing letters from writers of various views, it seems extremely important to vet these letters for truth, fact, and veracity. Yet you publish a letter from former President Trump, who doesn’t accept truth and fact. He continues to destroy our institutions and norms to advantage himself.

The decision to publish his letter was a mistake. It is not “cancel culture” to refuse to print false allegations and lies. It is important to support cold, hard facts. Because Mr. Trump’s assertions of “rigged” elections and “corruption” are so damaging to the fabric of a democratic society, a response to these fabrications from these editors is necessary.

Wall Street Journal, Letters to the Editor, Weekend, Oct. 30-31, 2021

LETTER 2:

If Democrats rigged the 2020 election employing the nefarious tactics alleged by President Trump, why didn’t Democrats apply the same dishonest devices to win more of the 435 House and 35 Senate races? The hundreds of Republican incumbents and challengers who lost their races haven’t complained to the Federal Election Commission or file lawsuits. Had Democrats possessed the power to rig elections in 2020, they surely would have used it to secure sufficient seats to avoid the congressional deadlock that plagues the American people today.

Wall Street Journal, Letters to the Editor, Weekend, Oct. 30 – 31, 2021

Backstory: Best When Introduced Slowly

Here it comes in Chapter 3 of The Killing Hills:

  • Before gathering walnuts, his grandfather raked through the brush with a long stick to frighten away the snakes. Most bites were on the hand and foot. It was the same with people, Papaw had said. Mick didn’t understand this until clearing rooms in Iraq and three comrades were shot in the hand by the enemy.

Life in Colour: Fall Blaze

Travel Words hosts Life in Colour, and the colour for October is orange.

This morning, self went on a walk around the neighborhood. Gosh, the colors! The colours!

Look! Look! Look!

Summer used to be self’s favorite season. Not any longer. Her favorite season now is fall.

Stay tuned.

Past Squares 23: Liverpool, November 2019

The Past Squares Challenge ends tomorrow. Becky, who hosts the challenge from Life of B, announced that the next Challenge will be in February.

The very best Chinese food in Liverpool is directly across from the Liverpool Cathedral. Self has a friend who moved to Manchester, and this friend knows all the BEST Chinese restaurants in Manchester and Liverpool.

The Museum of Liverpool, on Albert Dock, is one of those must-sees. And here is self! Who rarely appears in pictures! She’s wearing a hat given to her by a friend in Philadelphia, who told her this would be the only way to survive an English winter! Thanks much, Anne-Adele!

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

Poetry Friday: “Like the Molave” by Rafael Zulueta y da Costa, Written 1940

This poem is epic.

The molave was a Philippine hardwood (said to be impervious to fire), now extinct.

Jose Rizal was the writer of the seminal novels Noli me Tangere and El Filibusterismo. He was tried by the Spanish for inciting a revolution, and shot by firing squad in Manila’s Bagumbayan Field.

Self has not been able to find much about Rafael Zulueta y da Costa. He died in 1990, and apparently this was his only poem. He wrote in English. At the time of writing, the Philippines was still an American colony.

Like the Molave, Part I:

Not yet, Rizal, not yet. Sleep not in peace:
There are a thousand waters to be spanned;
There are a thousand mountains to be crossed;
There are a thousand crosses to be borne.
Our shoulders are not strong; our sinews are
Grown flaccid with dependence, smug with ease
Under another’s wing. Rest not in peace;
Not yet, Rizal, not yet. The land has need
of young blood — and, what younger than your own,
Forever spilled in the great name of freedom,
Forever oblate on the altar of the free?

Not you alone, Rizal. O souls
And spirits of the martyred brave, arise!
Arise and scour the land! Shed once again
Your willing blood! Infuse the vibrant red
Into our thin anemic veins; until
We pick up your Promethean tools and, strong,
Out of the depthless matrix of your faith
In us, and on the silent cliff of freedom,
We carve for all time your marmoreal dream!
Until our people, seeing, are become
Like the molave, firm, resilient, staunch,
Rising on the hillside, unafraid,
Strong in its own fibre; yes, like the molave:

Past Squares 22: London, December 2018

Self forgets. Memory is fallible. But photographs never lie.

She used to spend a lot of time in England and Ireland.

For Past Squares, her second post of the day: London, early December 2018.

Conclusion, England’s Magnificent Gardens

Author Roderick Floud has something to say about how GDP is calculated:

Activities such as housework, looking after children, or decorating homes, together with the gardening or the value of the fruit, flowers, and vegetables that are produced from it, are not counted. When there were plenty of paid gardeners, their wages would be counted as part of GDP; today, when it’s largely done by the householder, this time and effort are not.

So the role of gardening in the economy is much understated because it is largely excluded from GDP. Perhaps equally serious is the fact that few people realize how much land is taken up by gardens, nor the value of that land if it could be used for other purposes.

England’s Magnificent Gardens, p. 345

Past Squares 19: Souvenirs

Can you believe it’s THE LAST WEEK of Past Squares? WAH! It’s been such a fun challenge. Much gratitude to Life of B for hosting so many wonderful Squares Challenges.

Self’s roof sprang a leak during the last storm. Everything inside the closet was soaked, so she had to haul everything out and decide what was worth saving.

There’s a map of the New York subway system (!) and a poster that was probably something son made when he was an RA for Muir Hall, Cal Poly – San Luis Obispo.

Memories!

Witchy Moon: Mid-Week Monochrome #1

My entry for Ben Brashley’s Wednesday Photo Challenge, Mid-Week Monochrome, is the moon, seen from my backyard.

Halloween is just around the corner, YAY!

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