Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Needs To Have the Letter ‘K’ Anywhere In the Word

Self adores Cee Neuner’s Fun Foto Challenges: especially the ones on letters of the alphabet.

The current Fun Foto Challenge is for the Letter ‘K.’

Self’s word: SOCKS

DSCN0066

Self collects socks: These are from Albuquerque, New Mexico, where son Andrew and his fiancée Jennie were married, on Oct. 14.

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

More Rounded: Scythians at the British Museum and a Cake Decorated With Chocolate Flowers

So many grrreat examples of ROUNDED, everywhere self looks.

First, this from the Scythian Exhibit at the British Museum (The special exhibit is 16.50 GBP, but the rest of the museum is free. This beauty is just standing in the lobby, next to a concession stand):

DSCN0008

The Scythians, self learned from the exhibit, were nomads who roamed the wild Russian steppes. Everything of value to them was either made of fur or minted of gold. There are the most intricate golden belt buckles, as well as gold appliqués on thick fur coats.

Moving on:

Last night, self watched a play at The Gielgud: The Ferryman. The play was three hours and 15 minutes, one proper intermission, and a three-minute break to allow the audience to get up and stretch. During the first intermission, they sold Haagen Dasz caramel salt ice cream bars in the stalls (3 GBP)

Searing. The women actors were amazing. As was a live baby, who got onstage to get a diaper change and whose part was very nicely done (Baby never cried)

20171030_174856

Display Window, Caffé Concerto, Across from the Gielgud on Shaftesbury Ave.

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

VOICES FROM CHERNOBYL: Viktor Latun, Photographer

He died from cancer of the blood. We had a wake, and in the Slavic tradition we drank. And then the conversations began again, until midnight. First about him, the deceased. But after that? Once more about the fate of the country and the design of the universe. Will Russian troops leave Chechnya or not? Will there be a second Caucasian war, or has it already started? Could Zhirinovsky become President? Will Yeltsin be re-elected? About the British Royal Family and Princess Diana. About the Russian monarchy. About Chernobyl, the different theories. Some say that aliens knew about the catastrophe and helped us out; others that it was an experiment; and soon kids with incredible talents will start to be born. Or maybe the Belarussians will disappear, like the Scythians. We’re metaphysicians. We don’t live on this earth, but in our dreams, in our conversations. Because you need to add something to this ordinary life, in order to understand it. Even when you’re near death.

— p. 193, Voices From Chernobyl: The Oral History of a Nuclear Disaster, by Svetlana Alexievich (translated from the Russian by Keith Gessen)

ROUNDED: London in the Fall

London is beautiful at any time of year, but this is self’s first time to visit it in the Fall. She had some misgivings, but all of that were thrown out the window when she saw the lovely weather, and the familiar old buildings, and the fewer crowds.

So here, in honor of her first full day in London, three pictures of where she spent the day:

The Science Museum

DSCN0001

The Serpentine Pavilion 2017, by Francis Kéré, in Hyde Park

DSCN9993

The Serpentine Sackler Gallery, Hyde Park

DSCN9988

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

The Observer, Sunday, 29 October 2017

3-Page Special on US Politics in Today’s London Observer :

  • We must stop pretending the degradation of our politics and the conduct of some in our executive branch are normal . . .  Reckless, outrageous, and undignified behavior has become excused and countenanced as ‘telling it like it is’ when it is actually just reckless, outrageous and undignified.

— Jeff Flake, Republican Senator from Arizona, who is not seeking re-election

  • (Flake) is one of my most detested politicians . . .  Of the 14 Republicans who voted for (an amnesty on illegal immigration), five are gone.

— Ann Coulter, rightwing political commentator

Self was surprised that The Observer gave such prominent place to US politics. Because isn’t England going through some pretty weighty upheavals of its own? She’s grateful, though, for this chance to see America through a different lens. She thought about this article all through dinner.

Coulter exults that five of the Republicans who voted against amnesty on illegal immigration “are gone.” Subtext is that she’d be very glad to see the remaining nine “gone” too, payback for speaking out against the President. Like, being “gone” is proof that they are, to borrow a lame term from 45, losers.

Wait, why is The Observer quoting Coulters? Self never heard the name Ann Coulters on TV or in the newspapers, for almost a year. She isn’t that famous.

You know who’s famous? Ivanka Trump. Because Colbert makes fun of her.

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

 

#amwriting: THIS IS END

#amwritingdystopia #amwritingfantasy #amwritinghorror

sequel to her stories First Life (in Juked.com) and First Causes (in Quarterly West)

Floating, off to the right: the remains of the former space station, the Kobayashi Maru.

It caught fire. The wreckage drifted, was lost. Then found. Then lost, and found again.


Ice, another of her dystopian stories, will be in the Fall issue of Bellingham Review, which drops Nov. 15.

Stay tuned.

VOICES FROM CHERNOBYL: Colonel Yaroshuk

p. 131, Voices From Chernobyl: The Oral History of a Nuclear Disaster

Colonel Yaroshuk is dying now. He’s a chemist-dosimetrist. He was healthy as a bull, now he’s lying paralyzed. His wife turns him over like a pillow. She feeds him from a spoon. He has stones in his kidneys, they need to be shattered, but we don’t have the money to pay for that kind of operation. We’re paupers, we survive on what people give us. And the government behaves like a money lender, it’s forgotten these people. When he dies, they’ll name a street after him, or a school, or a military unit, but that’s only after he dies, Colonel Yaroshuk. He walked through the Zone and marked the points of maximum radiation — they exploited him in the fullest sense of the term, like he was a robot. And he understood this, but he went, he walked from the reactor itself and then out through all the sectors around the radius of reactivity. On foot. With a dosimeter in his hand. He’d feel a “spot” and then walk around its borders, so he could put it on his map, accurately.

Cleaning Up, Post-Apocalypse

A cameraman reports:

They were washing roofs. But how do you wash an old lady’s roof if it leaks? As for the soil, you had to cut off the entire fertile layer of it. After that there’s yellow sand. One old lady was following orders and throwing the earth out, but then scraping off the manure to use later. It’s too bad I didn’t shoot that.

— p. 105, Voices From Chernobyl: The Oral History of a Nuclear Disaster

A friend will ask self what she is reading now. When she tells them, they go, Sheesh! (Sub-text: You really must be a glutton for punishment!)

The first night after she began reading this book, she arrived in New York City. She stayed up all night, bug-eyed. The first story is the worst, the absolute worst. You just want to shake the stupid woman and cry. There’s all this florid Oh woe is me! I love my husband! Let me kiss him on his radioactive lips so that my unborn baby will know I did it all for love!

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

Rounded: Today at the Brooklyn Museum

It was self’s first time in the Brooklyn Museum.

The first floor had objects selected for an exhibit on the color BLUE. Which was such an interesting concept, self doesn’t think she’s ever seen color so directly addressed by any museum, anywhere (and she’s been to A LOT of museums). The objects ranged from medieval depictions of the Blessed Virgin to work by contemporary artists. That’s where she discovered the two Korean artists mentioned below.

DSCN0006

Detail, Robert Longo’s Bullet Hole, at the Brooklyn Museum

The fifth floor was where she found the Robert Longo photograph above, Bullet Hole.

DSCN9992

Korean Artist Ran Hwang’s East Wind (2012) at the Brooklyn Museum

DSCN9990

Korean Artist Lee Ufan’s Untitled (1973) at the Brooklyn Museum

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

 

VOICES FROM CHERNOBYL, AN ORAL HISTORY OF A DISASTER, p. 65

“I read in a book — it was by Father Sergei Bulgakov — it’s certain that God created the world, and therefore the world can’t possibly fail,” and so it is necessary to “endure history courageously and to the very end.”

« Older entries

Asian Cultural Experience

Preserving the history and legacy of Salinas Chinatown

Rantings Of A Third Kind

The Blog about everything and nothing and it's all done in the best possible taste!

Sauce Box

Never get lost in the Sauce

GK Dutta

Be One... Make One...

Cee's Photography

Learning and teaching the art of composition.

Fashion Not Fear

Fueling fearlessness through style and inspiration.

Wanderlust and Wonderment

My writing and photo journey of inspiration and discovery

transcribingmemory

Decades of her words.

John Oliver Mason

Observations about my life and the world around me.

Insanity at its best!

Yousuf Bawany's Blog

litadoolan

Any old world uncovered by new writing

unbolt me

the literary asylum

the contemporary small press

A site for small presses, writers, poets & readers

The 100 Greatest Books Challenge

A journey from one end of the bookshelf to the other

Random Storyteller

“Stories make us more alive, more human, more courageous, more loving.”― Madeleine L'Engle

Rants Of A Gypsy

Amuse Thyself Reader!

Kanlaon

Just another Wordpress.com weblog