Ape House Prime Time

NEEDLESS TO SAY, SPOILERS

p. 184:

  • “How about,” he said again, slower this time, spreading his hands in an expansive gesture: “Ape House Prime Time.” He gave them all a moment to let their imaginations take flight. “The apes are in charge, twenty-three hours a day. Then, once a day, we do something to affect their environment. Something,” he said, sitting forward, “voted on by the audience. The paying audience. People who have bought the monthly package. Twenty-three hours of doing whatever they want, and then one hour a day of doing something chosen by monthly subscribers.”

This satire of ambitious people (Americans, lol) in a television-driven culture is very sharp.

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

#amreading: APE HOUSE

Self’s indecision about Ape House is really annoying. First, she was sure she should skip it for American Gods, which is a very thick book. But time and time and time again she kept going back to Ape House and reading a little more, and a little more, and a little more, and finally she gave up and admitted to herself that she was really intrigued by the book’s premise and wanted to see how it all played out.

She’s on p. 149 (halfway, approx.)

SPOILER ALERT!!!

The apes are kidnapped by a sleazy producer named Faulks and made to star in their very own reality show called, TA-RA: Ape House!

The house is “in a remote area of New Mexico best known for its third-rate casinos and ‘gentlemen’s clubs.’ The house otherwise entirely empty except for a single computer and a stool so the apes could reach it. Faulks installed the apes, switched on the cameras, and had been broadcasting the results live ever since.

After five days, “the show gave every indication of becoming the biggest phenomenon in the history of modern media, and not simply because of the astonishing language and computer skills of the bonobos.”

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.