GHOST SOLDIERS, by Hampton Sides: the Surrender

Bataan Peninsula, April 1942:

Major General Edward King, commander of the American ground forces on Bataan, surrendered April 9 without informing his superiors, or General Wainwright on Corregidor. He said later that he was thinking of the 24,000 wounded who were crowded into field hospitals around southern Bataan: The field stations and hospitals were about to come “within range of enemy light artillery” which would have resulted, he said, in “the greatest slaughter in history.”

Hampton Sides:

Never had the U.S. Army fought against an enemy about whom it knew so little. The initial encounter between victor and vanquished would involve an extreme clash of two proud cultures whose profound ignorance of one another predictably generated intense feelings of racial animus and mutual disdain. There was a sense in which the defeated Americans had become victims of their own blithely held notions of racial superiority. (p. 51, Ghost Soldiers)

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

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