Gil Sorrentino/ Stanford Creative Writing

Dear blog readers, creative writing workshop made self very tense because she honestly had never met any American writers until she got into the Creative Writing Program, and they intimidated the heck out of her. One of her (male) classmates got up and danced on the table before the start of the workshop. Self can only say: she had never seen anything like it and was so amazed. Because if any of her college classmates in Manila had done that, they would have been arrested. Banned from campus. Reprimanded. But here, she got to enjoy the man’s dancing. lol

In addition, her classmates wrote about things like going hunting. Or going on road trips. She made herself read Jack Kerouac just so she could understand Americans better. The other writers came from different states: Arizona, Texas, North Carolina, Louisiana. Self was from the Philippines, and she for the life of her could not even open her mouth. Once there was sharp disagreement about one of her stories and self couldn’t even get up the gumption to explain what she was trying to do. Much to her everlasting shame, a fellow writer had to stick up for her and defend her, and then was so overwhelmed by the task that she left the workshop and had to hide in the Women’s Room for a while. And self followed her there but had nothing to say. Self was such a blithering idiot. This woman was kind enough to pick up the cudgels for her and all she could do afterwards was stare helplessly at her? She absolutely had no courage.

Seriously, every time she opened her mouth, she ended up putting her foot in it.

Gil Sorrentino was one of three professors who took turns leading workshop. He was this amazing, experimental writer and before self met him, she didn’t even know what “experimental fiction” was. His most famous book was Mulligan Stew. He led workshop on the day self’s story, Ginseng, was up.

Told from a “we” point of view, and self was so nervous.

After all the discussion, Gil looked at her and said, “What the narrator doesn’t understand is, after everything is said and done, the man still has his pride.”

Self realized that Gil had more sympathy for the old man than for the detached and critical narrator.

She didn’t realize it at the time, but the fact that Gil felt he had to defend the old man was an amazing thing.

Ginseng is narrated by a man whose father is gradually sinking into dementia. The narrator keeps describing all his symptoms while getting more and more amazed: why does the old man insist on putting on a Panama hat before he takes a walk?  Why does he carry around that fancy walking stick? The narrator felt only exasperation.

Self always imagined the narrator as a man because to write about an old person from a woman’s point of view and to be that detached was something self felt she couldn’t pull off.

The story begins:

  • My father is 83. Once he was very handsome, but now he has plump hips and breasts, with dark, pointed nipples on top of two triangles of brown, leathery skin. It is impossible for me to think of him as still a man in the usual sense, in the sense he has wanted me to think of him for so many years.

At VCCA, a long time ago, one of the other writers found this story, she doesn’t know how. He found a copy of the journal that had published it on one of the shelves of the VCCA library and showed it to her. AMAZING!

By now, self has read many, many American writers. She loves Jim Harrison. Part of the reason might be that she loves Yellow Dog and another reason may be that Harrison writes novellas. His stories are set in Michigan’s UP and they are so specific to that place but also so universal. She never got into Kerouac. She adored Cynthia Ozick and Grace Paley.

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

9 Comments

  1. September 4, 2016 at 4:40 pm

    It seemed like there was a lot of insensitivity in that writer’s workshop. That’s not the way it should be but there are a lot of writers out too too full of themselves.

    • September 4, 2016 at 5:26 pm

      Got to have a tough skin to be a writer. It was good preparation. Plus, I am proud to say one of the fellows was Jeffrey Eugenides, LOL!

      • September 5, 2016 at 2:25 pm

        You do need to have a tough skin. I’m not really looking forward to getting responses from publishers about my book! (But at the same time I am!!) I haven’t read anything by Eugenides by i did see the movies of the Virgin Suicides a long time ago, so that’s exciting!

      • September 5, 2016 at 2:27 pm

        Read The Virgin Suicides! I liked Middlesex, too. Oh, it is hard waiting to hear from publishers. I hope you’ve already started your next book!

      • September 5, 2016 at 2:37 pm

        Okay consider both on them on my reading list! And I haven’t sent the book out yet…I’m getting there. 🙂 (Shiver!!) Yes I have started the nest project – or more accurately started a few and I’m finding which one to settle on and sink into. Thanks!

      • September 5, 2016 at 3:12 pm

        I know the feeling! Big hugs

      • September 5, 2016 at 3:18 pm

        Thanks!

  2. Genny said,

    March 7, 2017 at 1:23 am

    Haha this is great 🙂

    • March 7, 2017 at 9:31 am

      I know, right? I was nervous, every single day. I even forced myself to read MOBY DICK, all 900 pages of it. Just to round out my reading.


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