Against All Odds: Really Enjoying THE GIRL ON THE TRAIN

Self thinks she read somewhere that Emily Blunt is starring in the movie.

And self adores Emily Blunt.

Self has taken a peek at the end; the reviews say there’s a surprise ending. And she can’t take the suspense of spending one or two weeks with a book, identifying with this or that character, and then being blind-sided. She just can’t.

Anyhoo, there’s a missing woman. And the other woman, the one who’s been watching her on the train, has fabricated quite a story for her. Now that the woman’s life is news, the woman who made up stories can finally find out how close to the mark she was:

Megan has no family in the area. Both her parents are deceased.

Megan is unemployed. She used to run a small art gallery in Whitney, but it closed down in April last year (I knew Megan would be arty).

Scott is a self-employed IT consultant (I can’t bloody believe Scott is an IT consultant)

The story reminds self a little of the first-person piece she read in The Guardian, some years back: Sarah Hepola and her alcoholic blackouts. Self has seen drunk people, many times. But it somehow feels more raw in England. Her last experience with full-on drunkenness was riding back to London on a train from Cambridge, on a Saturday night. And holy cow, it wasn’t just the drunkenness, there was weed smoking and general loudness and belligerence. And self sat miserably in her seat for two hours and wondered why the conductor never came by to ask for tickets. (Stupid: why would a conductor put himself/herself through that on a Saturday night, on a train full of drunk people?)

After she got off the train, her nerves were rather frayed. She decided to take a cab instead of the underground. She said a little about the train to the cabbie and he shrugged: “Young people,” the cabbie said. “Saturday night.”

Anyhoo, one of the women in The Girl On the Train is an alcoholic. The kind of alcoholic who comes home with bumps on her head and bruises on her thighs and no memory of what happened (“I feel excited. I feel afraid.”)

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

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