Last Monday of December 2013, Still Reading HOW I FOUND LIVINGSTONE IN CENTRAL AFRICA

This morning, on account of that no-good cough, which has persisted in self’s lungs since a week ago (but which also gives self a very, very good excuse not to cook, there’s always a silver lining etc etc), self was able to read a few more pages of How I Found Livingstone in Central Africa, the epic account by Henry M. Stanley of his long quest searching Africa for the vanished explorer.  It is indeed a very, very riveting book.  Obivously, since Stanley’s bills were being paid for by the New York Herald, he took copious and careful notes, which he sent back to the newspaper for serialization.  For which we readers must be exceedingly grateful.

In addition to Stanley’s book, however, self is also re-reading (for maybe the 10th time) the second book of The Hunger Games Trilogy, Catching Fire.  Also, she has located on tumbler approximately 4,200 sites that ship “Delly Cartwright.”  Who is Delly Cartwright, one may well ask?  She is a minor character in Mockingjay, the third book of The Hunger Games Trilogy.  She appears in about five pages.  Anyhoo, it is both thrilling and daunting to see how many permutations of Delly Cartwright there are on Tumbler:  everywhere from animé versions to photos of the following young (blonde) actresses:  Anna Sophie Robb, Elle Fanning, Chloe Moretz, and so forth.

But, back to the Stanley book.  Here’s a quote, from pp. 148 – 149:

Listen, children of Unyamwezi!  The journey is for tomorrow!  The road is crooked and bad, bad!  The jungle is there, and many Wagogo lie hidden within it!  Wagogo spear the pagazis, and cut the throats of those who carry mutumba (bales) and ushanga (beads)!  The Wagogo have been to our camp, they have seen your bales; to-night they seek the jungle:  tomorrow watch well, O Wanyamwezi!  Keep close together, lag not behind!  Kirangozis walk slow, that the weak, the sick, and the young may keep up with the strong!  Take two rests on the journey!  These are the words of the Bana (master).

There is, you know, such a Biblical rhythm to this speech.  It goes on for quite a bit longer, but self must stop here so that she can focus on getting well.

Stay tuned.

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