Quotes, First Monday of May (2013)

Is it the sixth of May already?  How can it be?  Is self dreaming?  Is she still in Venice?  Did she move to Trieste?

Self then gives herself a good shake and settles in to read reviews of last night’s “Game of Thrones.”

No, not last night’s “Game of Thrones,” because that one only had a teaser about Daenerys and some flying about of her loyal dragons.

Self is reading reviews of the episode before last night’s, the one with the hot tub scenes.

What?  Dear blog readers didn’t know that in medieval times, there was easy access to hot tubs?  Well, now you know.

In a nutshell, here is what happened the week before last to the mis-matched pair, Jaime Lannister (aka “Kingslayer”) and his captor/bodyguard, Brienne of Tarth.

Jaime, recently gravely injured, joined his former captor during her bath and for the first time reveals why he infamously killed Mad King Aerys and earned the derogatory nickname “Kingslayer.” (James Hibberd of insidetv.ew.com)

  • “Gravely injured” means Jaime’s right hand was chopped off.
  • “Kingslayer” is derogatory?  Now self knows.

Here’s another version of the same scene, this from the Vancouver Observer.  Yup, that’s right.  The Vancouver Observer:

Brienne of Tarth is taking a bath.  Turns out there’s a woman under all that mud.  Jaime Lannister slinks in, says “Don’t mind if I do,” drops trou and walks towards Brienne’s tub.

There are apparently other hot tubs in the area, as Brienne, fierce woman warrior that she is, is about to vacate and go to another one.  Seems there’s a veritable spa in the castle where Jamie and Brienne are being held prisoner.

Jamie tells Brienne to stay, saying something like “Don’t worry, it’s just me.”  And then he tells her a story, which is the most boring story in the whole world, self doesn’t know why a man and woman sitting in a hut tub have to do exposition.  But finally, Jamie says something to Brienne that pisses her off and she gets up and stands to her full height.  And Jamie gulps and —  next thing you know, he falls in a dead faint (because he’s never seen a giantess naked before?) and Brienne has to hold him in her arms, calling for help for the Kingslayer.  At which point, the guy who we all thought had fainted mumbles:  “Jamie.  My name’s Jamie.”

TA-DA!

Last night’s episode, Brienne was dressed as a woman, and Jamie was trying to eat a steak with one hand and failing miserably, much to the sadistic enjoyment of their host, the Lord of the Castle.  Brienne reaches out a hand and sticks Jamie’s steak with her fork (Holy Metaphor!), and Jamie then resumes cutting his meat with some semblance of dignity.  There was some gratuitous hand-holding afterwards.

Note to male/female prisoners:  When in the clutches of enemy, never hold hands.  This only provides Captor with more sadistic ideas about how to get each of you so muddled you’ll do/say anything.

And now to the REAL quote of the day, which is from a story by Paul La Farge (“Another Life”) in The New Yorker of July 2, 2012.  Yup, self is really scraping the bottom of the barrel now, in her Humongous Pile of Stuff.

The story needs to be placed in context:  a long-married couple go to Boston to attend the wife’s father’s 60th birthday party.  The husband finds the whole idea tiresome, he’d rather hole up in his room with Rousseau’s “Discourse on the Origin of Inequality” :  “Nature commands every animal and the beast obeys,” Rousseau writes (Self can’t believe she’s never thought of Rousseau before, especially since she’s now completely hooked on Game of Thrones.)  At some point, the husband decides to continue reading Rousseau in the hotel bar, so he brings his book down with him:

The husband is not trying to pick anyone up.  His wife will be back in an hour or two, and besides who would dream of picking someone up with Rousseau?  Of all the authors you could try to pick someone up with, Rousseau is probably the worst.  Or maybe Kant.  The husband orders a hot toddy.  The bartender, an attractive young woman with crinkly black hair, brings him the drink and they exchange remarks about it.  Is that what you wanted?  Yes, it’s perfect, the husband says.  Good, I’m glad.  The bartender smiles.  The husband reads more Rousseau.  Upstairs, in his room, he was really understanding the Second Discourse, but down here at the bar he finds it hard to concentrate.

Stay tuned, dear blog readers.  Stay tuned.

Most Surprising Quote of the First Sunday of May (2013)

“She was very strict about everybody’s time in life.  Children should be allowed to play because you’re going to need all your happiness to grow up.”

—  Luca Dotti, second son of Audrey Hepburn, describing his mother in the May 2013 Vanity Fair

Self is practically keeling over with exhaustion.  Doubtful whether she can keep her eyes open long enough to catch the 10 p.m. screening of “Game of Thrones.”  She almost fell out of her chair just a few minutes ago, so tired is she.  She came to with a start.  Now she knows what people mean when they use the expression, “dead on your feet.”

But, she did manage to catch Episode 5 of “Game of Thrones” last night, the episode where Jamie gets his amputated arm cauterized (without benefit of prior numbing with the “milk of the poppy” —  Don’t say you don’t know what that refers to!  Come on, it grows wild in the kingdoms of Game of Thrones almost as much as the opium poppy grows wild in the far reaches of Afghanistan) and where he gets into a steaming hot pool where the Amazonian Brienne is seen in vulnerable state (i.e., naked).  Naturally, he flings himself forward into the pool (after an endless conversation during which he takes care to keep his bloody stump — wrapped in the grimiest bandages this side of gangrene — out of the steaming water) and Brienne darts forward to hold him up out of the water (presumably, even in water that shallow, one might drown, and viewers all know how fastidious Brienne is).  “Kingslayer!” she calls out.  To whom exactly, is left ambiguous.  But the response is perfect:  “Jaime,” the man gasps.  “My name is Jaime,” before fainting dead away in Brienne’s Amazonian embrace.

Wow.  That was a great scene.  Can’t wait to see more of these two parrying and then falling into each other’s arms (Not having read any of the books, self is merely imagining the possibilities)

Self also liked the scene where the little girl who is dressed as a boy has to be very stoic and unafraid in the presence of a very smelly and dastardly variety of men.  Self’s mind kept scurrying hither and thither, thinking Oh no, oh no, don’t let anything happen to that plucky little girl.  Because even though this is alternate history, the men are still dastardly and the girl has a kind of Christina Ricci vibe going on, what with her dark hair and her dark eyes and that round face . . .  Thankfully, the scene comes to an end before any of self’s wild imaginings bear fruit.

Daenerys was back but somehow self has completely lost interest in her.  Unless Daenerys can get those dragons to make greater hoo-ha around her, it will take a lot to re-focus self’s attention.

Stay tuned, dear blog readers.  Stay tuned.

The life of B

Mainly through the lens of a Nikon

myguiltypleasures

welcome to my past, present and future mixed with whatever pops up right now

Iain Kelly

Fiction Writing

John's Space .....

"Two roads diverged in a wood, and I— I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all the difference." The Road Not Taken, by Robert Frost

nancy merrill photography

capturing memories one moment at a time

Rantings Of A Third Kind

The Blog about everything and nothing and it's all done in the best possible taste!

Sauce Box

Never get lost in the Sauce

GK Dutta

Be One... Make One...

Cee's Photo Challenges

Teaching the art of composition for photography.

Fashion Not Fear

Fueling fearlessness through fashion and inspiration.

Wanderlust and Wonderment

My writing and photo journey of inspiration and discovery

transcribingmemory

Decades of her words.

John Oliver Mason

Observations about my life and the world around me.

Insanity at its best!

Yousuf Bawany's Blog

lita doolan productions

Any old world uncovered by new writing

unbolt me

the literary asylum

CSP Archives

Archive of the CSP

The 100 Greatest Books Challenge

A journey from one end of the bookshelf to the other