Literary Magazine Spotlight: The Asian American Literary Review, Winter 2012

How does a literary magazine survive?  Self at one time had high ambitions:  She thought she’d like to edit one.  Then she realized how much time she’d have to give up.  Time she could spend writing, or traveling, or growing a garden, or writing her friends (or, now, blogging), or cooking, or walking her dog, or cleaning up, or getting organized, or watching movies, or exercising.

Today she’d like to honor the people who put out The Asian American Literary Review.

Have you seen it, dear blog readers?  It is so substantial, so hefty, it is easily twice the size of Ploughshares, or the Paris Review.  And the editors, Lawrence Minh Bui Davis and Gerald Maa, not satisfied with this vast labor, still organize symposiums in conjunction with other entities, like last April’s tie-in with the National Portrait Gallery.  And they are so humble.  And open to new ideas.  And always coming up with thought-provoking themed issues.

The Winter 2012 issue is on “Portraiture.”

Among the writers featured are:  Luisa Igloria, Brian Ascalon Roley, Lillian Howan, and Brian Komei Dempster.  There are interviews of Gary Snyder by Shawna Yang Ryan,  and of Garrett Hongo by Michael Collier.

There are reviews of books like My Postwar Life:  New Writings from Japan and Okinawa, edited by Elizabeth McKenzie, and No Enemies, No Hatred:  Selected Essays and Poems, by Liu Xiaobo.

Buy the issue here, or take out a subscription.  You won’t regret it, dear blog readers.

Stay tuned.

Personal Library # 28: Son’s Room, Part 9 (Found: BATTLE MAPS OF THE CIVIL WAR)

Happy Monday!  As usual, self aims to please.

She has arrived at a milestone of sorts:  The below are books on the lowest shelf of Bookcase # 1 in son’s room.  After this, self will tackle the shelves above his desk.

961 + 37 = 998 Total Books Counted Thus Far

Considering that most of these books are at least 20 years old, they are in surprisingly good condition.  The books on the lowest shelf of the bookcase include:  9 Eyewitness Books, including Early Humans and Dinosaurs:  How They Lived; Social Psychology, 5th edition;  9 Tin Tin books; Starry Messenger, by Peter Sis;  Frederick, by Leo Lionni; Mr. Gumpy’s Outing, by John Burningham;  The Wild Swans, by Hans Christian Andersen, Retold by Amy Ehrlich; and Battle Maps of the Civil War.

The last one has the most beautiful illustrated maps!  There is a map of the Battle of Shiloh’s first day, (April 2, 1862).  There is a map of the Battle at Mechanicsville (June 26, 1862).   There is another of the Battle of Fredericksburg (Dec. 13, 1862).  There is another of the Battle of Chancellorsville’s second day (May 2, 1862).  There is the map of a series of battles fought at Vicksburg (from December 1862 to July 1863).  There is a map of the Battle of Gettysburg’s second day (July 2, 1863).  There is a map of the Battle of Chickamauga’s second day (Sept. 20, 1863).

Each battle is accompanied by formal photographs of the main protagonists.  Mechanicsville has pictures of Gen. Robert E. Lee, Major Gen. A. P. Hill, Major Gen. George B. McClellan, and Major Gen. Fitz-John Porter.  The battle unfolds thus:

Porter’s Yankees contain A. P. Hill’s frontal attacks at Beaver Dam Creek, an assault doomed by Jackson’s failure to move against the Union flank.  Porter pulls back that night.  A. P. Hill is repulsed at 2 p.m., and so is Longstreet’s diversion two hours later.  The divisions of D. H. Hill and Ewell hit the Union right about 4:30, but are driven off with heavy losses.

Fascinating, simply fascinating.

Stay tuned.

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