One Word Sunday Challenge: MOBILE/MOBIL

The theme for this week’s One Word Sunday Challenge is MOBILE/MOBIL.

Without further ado, her mobile/mobil pictures:

(1) Bird in flight

(2) Alexander Calder mobiles in the recent Calder/Picasso exhibit at the de Young Museum in Golden Gate Park

Stay safe, dear blog readers. Stay safe.

Your Brother Lets You Drive His Porsche

  • Gilbert put the car in Drive and pulled out into the street. “It feels so tight,” he said. He feathered the gas and the car leapt forward. “Christ, it doesn’t take much.” — p. 88, Find You First, by Linwood Barclay

When the Diagnosis is Bad

But in the last week, he’d renewed his friendship with Absolut Vodka. And he’d found that it went very well with Cheetos. Fucking Cheetos. He’d been through the McDonald’s drive-through twice, gorging on Big Macs and fries. He couldn’t believe how good this shit tasted. Took home Domino’s one night. Ate the whole goddamn pizza himself. Woke up at midnight with the worst heartburn of his entire life. Briefly wondered — and at some level hoped — it was a heart attack and things would be over now.

— p. 30, Find You First, by Linwood Barclay

Summer 2021 Read # 2: FIND YOU FIRST

Scorching hot day. Downtown, everyone’s in t-shirts. Yes, it is summer. Kids ran madly around the lobby of the Century 20. Self has been sleeping an average of four hours a night, thinking much of Dear Departed Mum. But today, she is determined to keep ambulatory. Hence, the movie (Raya and the Last Dragon), the books. After the movie, a stop at Go Poke. Movies are back, restaurants are back, even traffic is back.

Oak Flat: The Fight for Sacred Land in the American West was a great book. Her next, Find You First, is, according to Stephen King, “the best book” of Linwood Barclay’s career.

For self, all thrillers must be measured against the beginning of Eddie’s Boy, by Thomas Perry. Page one of Eddie’s Boy, there were already three bodies in the trunk of the main character’s Bentley and he hadn’t even broken into a sweat.

This one begins rather slow, with a loser grifter and his pathetic burner phone. Next is a young documentarian in an old folks’ home; sadly, the chapter does not slay. Then we have the millionaire/billionaire with the boring name of Miles Cookson, receiving a diagnosis of Huntington’s which is dementia mixed with Parkinson’s mixed with something else, and next he’s driving 90 in his speedster Porsche and being pulled over. A Porsche, btw, is a really really boring car. Leather bucket seats? So what else is new. She sees a lot of them around here, but it would be better to have a Tesla. Or some sort of hybrid luxury ride, like a Lexus SUV.

That’s all self has read so far. (Maybe the cop will try to kill the millionaire/billionaire? Let’s hope!)

Stay cool, dear blog readers. Stay cool.

The Dialogue

Linwood Barclay writes good dialogue.

For example:

They found a nearby Denny’s and demanded coffee immediately. Kendra ordered a veggie omelette, Rhys went for the steak and eggs.

“You know, I usually work alone,” Rhys said as he sipped on his first cup.

“Same,” she said. “But the client was right, figuring this was a two-person job.”

“Yeah,” he said. “Different.”

“So, Rhys, you got a real name?”

“I do. But how do you know it isn’t Rhys?”

“No one would really want to be named Rhys. If it was your name, you’d change it.”

“How about Kendra? Sounds like you walked out of a Chanel ad.”

“Okay, so I’m not Kendra and you’re not Rhys.”

Rhys raised his mug and smiled. “To us, whoever we are.”

— p. 173, Find You First, by Linwood Barclay

Three So Far 2021

Finished reading Oak Flat: The Fight for Sacred Land in the American West, by Lauren Redniss, early this morning. Wow. Blown away by the polyphonic voices. And by the simple yet so-moving illustrations (by the author herself).

It joins two other books as self’s five-star reads of the 2021 reading year:

  • Ice Walker: A Polar Bear’s Journey Through the Frozen Arctic, by James Raffan (nonfiction)
  • The Relentless Moon, by Mary Robinette Kowal (science fiction)

Mary Robinette Kowal is one of the authors participating in this year’s SiliCon, which will be happening this August at the San Jose Convention Center. Self rushed out and got her tickets. She can’t waaaaait for August.

Have a great summer, dear blog readers.

The Dakota Pipeline and the Standing Rock Sioux

In 2016, protests against the Dakota Access Pipeline attracted worldwide attention. The oil pipeline was designed to run from North to South Dakota, across Iowa, and into Illinois. The Standing Rock Sioux objected to the pipeline’s path on the grounds that it violated treaty rights and threatened the tribe’s water supply, grave sites and sacred land. Thousands camped out at Standing Rock to try and stop the project . . . In December 2016, the Obama administration blocked construction of the pipeline’s most contested section.

A month later, newly inaugurated president Donald Trump reversed the decision. By June 2017, oil was flowing. In the tumultuous first year of the Trump administration, the media moved on. In September 2017, Standing Rock Sioux tribal chairman David Archambault II, a hero while the spotlight was trained on the controversy, was voted out of office.

— Chapter 10, Oak Flat: the Fight for Sacred Land in the American West

This is a fascinating book, as self keeps saying. She hopes she can finish it tonight and return it to the library tomorrow, because it’s way overdue and someone’s put a hold on it.

Stay safe, dear blog readers. Stay safe.

Quote of the Day: General Nelson Miles, Who Tricked Geronimo

“I had it in my mind to utilize for our benefit and their discomfiture, the very elements that had been the greatest obstacles in that whole country to their subjugation, namely, the high mountain ranges, the glaring, burning sunlight, and an atmosphere void of moisture.” — Oak Flat: The Fight for Sacred Land in the American West, p. 121

Under General Miles, the U.S. Signal Corps established 14 heliograph stations in Arizona: “a network of points of observation and communication . . . on the high mountain peaks of this region,” including on Mount Graham. “It was remarkable what advantage (the stations) gave us in observing the movements of the Indians or of the troops in the valleys below,” wrote Miles in his memoir. A nineteenth-century heliostat was essentially a mirror mounted on a tripod. An operator could send a message to another station using a system of short and long flashes of light beamed off the mirror in a kind of visual Morse code. The larger the mirror and clearer the atmosphere, the farther the light signal could travel.

On Sept. 3, 1886, “on the western edge of Arizona’s Skeleton Canyon, Geronimo surrendered. Shortly after, Naiche, the last hereditary chief of the Chiricahua Apache, surrendered, too.”

This is a fascinating book.

When Your Mother Has a Dream

Theresa Noise: “I knew it was time. I kept saying, It’s time. She’s getting moody. We’ve got to get ready.”

In August 1997, Theresa Noise sensed her daughter Alicia might be about to get her period for the first time. She was anxious to begin preparations for Alicia’s Sunrise Dance.

That’s when Theresa’s dreams began.

— pp. 115 – 116, Oak Flat: The Fight for Sacred Land in the American West

Life in Colour: Silver

Self has many white flowers, so for this challenge, hosted by Jude on Travel World Blog, she will push herself to look for SILVER:

  • Silver is a precious metal, indicating wealth. “Born with a silver spoon in your mouth”. A cool colour. Sparkling silver water. The light of the moon. It represents feminine energy, pure, emotional and sensitive.

Her MacBook Air is silver. She’s had three MacBook Airs, but this one she’s had the longest (five years)

Here is Alexander Calder’s “Fish.” Self was lucky enough to attend the Picasso/Calder exhibit at the de Young Museum in March, almost as soon as it re-opened:

March was also when self took her first road trip post-pandemic. She went to Sacramento, to visit the Crocker. She stayed in an Airbnb in an old house that used to be a laundry. For reading material (and she ALWAYS) has reading material, she brought Douglas Stuart’s novel, Shuggie Bain. The room she stayed in was white, the bedspread was white, and the book had a black-and-white (well, more like silver) cover.

Stay safe, dear blog readers. Stay safe.

« Older entries

The life of B

Mainly through the lens of a Nikon

myguiltypleasures

welcome to my past, present and future mixed with whatever pops up right now

Iain Kelly

Fiction Writing

John's Space .....

"Two roads diverged in a wood, and I— I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all the difference." The Road Not Taken, by Robert Frost

nancy merrill photography

capturing memories one moment at a time

Rantings Of A Third Kind

The Blog about everything and nothing and it's all done in the best possible taste!

Sauce Box

Never get lost in the Sauce

GK Dutta

Be One... Make One...

Cee's Photo Challenges

Teaching the art of composition for photography.

Fashion Not Fear

Fueling fearlessness through fashion and inspiration.

Wanderlust and Wonderment

My writing and photo journey of inspiration and discovery

transcribingmemory

Decades of her words.

John Oliver Mason

Observations about my life and the world around me.

Insanity at its best!

Yousuf Bawany's Blog

lita doolan productions

Any old world uncovered by new writing

unbolt me

the literary asylum

CSP Archives

Archive of the CSP

The 100 Greatest Books Challenge

A journey from one end of the bookshelf to the other