Signs 4: Out and About in London, Spring 2014

Self stopped by London in April 2014. Her friend, poet Joan McGavin, accompanied her to Kensington Gardens. We looked for the new Serpentine Gallery but never found it. Instead, we stumbled across this:

Kensington Gardens, London:  April 2014

Kensington Gardens, London: April 2014

The Serpentine is a beautiful, meandering river. Signs alongside tell viewers what kind of water fowl to be on the lookout for.

Sign along the Serpentine: April 2014

Sign along the Serpentine: April 2014

The day after self arrived in London, there was a tube strike. This sign at the entrance to the Russell Square Station said it all:

London Underground, Russell Square Station: April 2014

London Underground, Russell Square Station: April 2014

Stay tuned, dear blog readers.  Stay tuned.

 

Nighttime: WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge

This week, the WordPress Photo Challenge asks us to share our photos of nighttime:

What nocturnal photos do you like taking? Whether it’s a street sky, a street lamp, or the shadows cast by your cat, share them with us.

101, 10:30 p.m., Saturday Night, May 2013

Heading home on 101, 10:30 p.m., Saturday Night, May 2013

Chatting outside Church of the Gesu, Ateneo, October 2013

Chatting outside Church of the Gesu, Ateneo, October 2013

In the backyard, looking at the moon to bury my disappointment over Chiefs vs Broncos

In the backyard, looking at the moon to bury my disappointment over Chiefs vs Broncos, 2012

Endurance 3: Various Interpretations of This Week’s WordPress Photo Challenge

Again, self knows nothing about the creator of this. sculpture. It stands just outside the Olympic Theatre (the one designed by Palladio) in Vicenza.

Self knows nothing about the creator of this. sculpture. It stands just outside the Teatro Olimpico (designed by Palladio in the late 16th century) in Vicenza.

Backyard Watering: Takes Endurance, especially in the summer.

Backyard Watering: Takes Endurance, especially in the summer.

Spam was first introduced to the Philippines by the Americans. Now we Filipinos crave it -- it's become "comfort food."

Spam was first introduced to the Philippines by the Americans. Now we Filipinos crave it — it’s become “comfort food.”

 

Dialogue 3: WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge

The WordPress Photo Challenge this week is DIALOGUE. The prompt says, “make pictures talk to each other.”

Here are two photographs of a couple of chairs in self’s backyard, some on the deck, one on the grass.

Do these pictures engage in dialogue?

2 Chairs, Backyard

2 Chairs, Backyard

DSCN0257

Stay tuned, dear blog readers.  Stay tuned.

Zigzag 2: WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge

The first two pictures are of self’s backyard:  She has one long hose that she uses to water, in a “zigzag” pattern around her yard.

Backyard Watering: Zigzag Hose

Backyard Watering: Zigzag Hose

And she has a few metal plant supports scattered around:

Twisting Metal Trellis, Side Yard

Twisting Metal Trellis, Side Yard

The final picture is from the Asian Art Museum.  The last time self visited, the lobby had a display of cards written by schoolchildren responding to an exhibit.  She likes that the cards are arranged in a rather “disorderly” pattern.  Gives the whole arrangement a feeling of spontaneity.

The cards were written by children responding to their favorite exhibits.

The cards were written by children responding to their favorite exhibits at the Asian Art Museum.

Stay tuned, dear blog readers.  Stay tuned.

 

 

Endless Summer Lovin’

Backyard, Summer

Backyard, Summer

Backyard:  Clematis "Niobe"

Backyard: Clematis “Niobe”

"Polka," one of self's oldest roses. It blooms only once a year, early spring.

“Polka,” one of self’s oldest roses. It blooms only once a year, early spring.

Stay tuned, dear blog readers.  Stay tuned.

Still More Summer Lovin’

Plants blooming now in self’s garden:

Amaryllis belladonna, otherwise known as "Naked Lady" for its complete absence of foliage. These usually only get going in August.

Amaryllis belladonna, otherwise known as “Naked Lady” for its complete absence of foliage. These usually only get going in August.

Paid $10 for this wee plum tree from Whole Foods.  I didn't expect it to bear fruit so soon.

Paid $10 for this wee plum tree from Whole Foods. I didn’t expect it to bear fruit so soon.

The white lilies popped up unexpectedly a few days ago:  Self forgot she even planted them.

The white lilies popped up unexpectedly a few days ago: Self forgot she even planted them.

Stay tuned, dear blog readers.  Stay tuned.

“The Hydrangea”

Self loves gardens.  Ergo, she loves reading about gardens.

And when she isn’t reading a gardening magazine, she’s reading literary journals.

Today self is reading a back issue of the New Orleans Review.  They published a piece of hers, “Thing.”  Which was science fiction.  It was the start of her new experiments in genre.  Thank you, New Orleans Review.

And here is a flower poem by L. S. Klatt.  It’s called “The Hydrangea.”

In a hospital bed, the hydrangea
lies sedated. A gown covers it,
stem to neck, but neglect sunburned ankles
that seem to have walked a mile through dune grass.
And what a day that must have been, the head
of the flower, in a bathing cap, out
searching for wavy blue. June, the blooming
season, hothouse of panicles & Starstreaks.
Then August, rainwater dripping through a
French horn of tubes; the hydrangea
dishevels on a pillow, wilted giant.

Oh dear! The poor hydrangea! Well, hopefully the hydrangea in the poem will recover soon.

Stay tuned, dear blog readers. Stay tuned.

Twist 3: The Stone Lintel’s Close-Up

The stone lintel self passes almost every day, in the garden between the farmyard cottages and the Main House of the Tyrone Guthrie Centre in Annaghmakerrig, is now ready for its close-up:

What is this mysterious thing?  And what is it doing on the grounds of the Tyrone Guthrie Center?  Who made it?  And why?

What is this mysterious thing? And what is it doing on the grounds of the Tyrone Guthrie Center? Who made it? And why?  Her musings about it remind her of her musings on the mysteries of Stonehenge.

Self thinks it is a very good thing to do an artists residency in a rainy place — such as a boggy island like Ireland — because one is given so much incentive to stay indoors.  And since everything else is so far away (like movie theatres, like newspapers, like television), one perforce has to exercise the utmost resourcefulness to keep oneself entertained.  And, in self’s particular case, that means concocting convoluted (yet entertaining) narratives involving ships and voyages and science and spores and changeables and hedgehogs and Commons and bongs and elephants and imaginary cities.

Stay tuned, dear blog readers.  Stay tuned.

Twist 2: Walking Around (Still in Annaghmakerrig)

An old stone lintel next to a very big fern: on the grounds of the Tyrone Guthrie Centre

An old stone lintel next to a very big fern: on the grounds of the Tyrone Guthrie Centre

There’s a stone lintel that self passes whenever she goes to the Main House.  She finally decided to take a closer look at it today.  She was going to post a close-up of the carving, it looked like a piece of Mayan art to tell you the truth.

But her internet connection has been wisping in and out.

Instead, she’ll post an excerpt from a piece called “Shaft,” by Anne Enright.  It was in a hard-bound book she found in the dining room of the Main House (a compilation of writings by all the various residents who had been at the Centre, over the decades):

I always look people in the eye, you know?  This is just the way I am.  Even if they have a disability or a strangeness about them.  I look them straight in the eye.  And if one of their eyes is damaged, then I look at the good eye, because this is where they are, somehow.  I think it’s only polite.  But I am not always right.  Some people want you to look at their ‘thing’ and not at them.  Some people need you to.

There was that young transvestite I met in the street once: I used to know his mother, and there were his lovely eyes, still hazel under all that mascara and the kohl.  Well, I didn’t know where else to look at him, except in the eye, but also, I think, I wanted to say hello to him.  Himself.  The boy I used to know.  And of course this was not what he wanted at all.  He wanted me to admire his dress.

Stay tuned, dear blog readers.  Stay tuned.

 

 

 

 

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