More Silhouettes

Grand Central Baking Company, Pioneer Park, Seattle:  February 2014

Grand Central Baking Company, Pioneer Square, Seattle: February 2014

Hand-blown glass, The Glass House near Pioneer Square, Seattle:  February 2014

Hand-blown glass, The Glass House near Pioneer Square, Seattle: February 2014

Neighbor's Front Yard, Redwood City, December 2013

Neighbor’s Front Yard, Redwood City, December 2013

 

Silhouette 3: Los Angeles County Museum of Art

The Daily Post prompt says:  “Photography is all about experimenting with light, and then positioning yourself (or your subject) in the right spot to achieve a certain effect.”

To honor the theme of this week’s Photo Challenge, SILHOUETTE, self decided to take this photo of a Pieta from the side, so that we don’t see the grieving mother’s face (She forgot to note the name of the artist. But the other pieces in the gallery ranged from the 15th to the 17th century)

Pieta: European Art Collection, LACMA

Pieta: European Art Collection, LACMA

Across the street From the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, a onstruction zone was demarcated with a green plastic wall. Through it, you could see the silhouette of palm trees.

Across the street From the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, a onstruction zone was demarcated with a green plastic wall. Through it, you could see the silhouette of palm trees.

Palm Trees in Front of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art

Palm Trees in Front of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art

Listmania: Six Recently Bookmarked/ 12 Existing Tags

*     *     *     *

Naomi Watts *  Oliver Stone * Owen Wilson * Patrick Leigh Fermor * Paul Theroux * Peter Sarsgaard * Pico Iyer * Rebecca West * Ruth Rendell * Sarah Waters * Siquijor * Tom Hiddleston

Zigzag: WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge

The WordPress Photo Challenge this week is Zigzag:

The instructions are to “share a photo that foregoes the straightforward in favor of the twisting and winding.”

(After pondering the three photographs from her archives, self realizes they are more about “crosshatchings” than about zigzags.  The WordPress Daily Post instructions seem to be asking for photos of “crooked,” and none of the below are that.  Oh well, she’ll just keep trying.)

Photo # 1 is a sketchbook belonging to one of the Squaw Valley Writers Conference participants.  During readings, she’d busy herself sketching and drawing and coloring.  Below is a sample page of her sketchbook.  There’s a lot of cross-hatching in the depiction of the trees, which is why self chose this photo as her first “Zigzag” entry:

Sketchbook Belonging to a Squaw Valley Writers Conference participant

Sketchbook Belonging to a Squaw Valley Writers Conference participant

Self took Photo # 2 on a recent visit to son and Jennie in Claremont.  Jennie and self were wandering around a mall when self saw this interesting ceiling. For sure, there are lots of zigzags depicted here!

Mall Interior, Montclair, Southern California

Mall Interior, Montclair, Southern California

Finally, here are some zigzagging stage lights at the Button Factory Music Centre in the Temple Bar section of Dublin.  Self was attending a fundraising benefit in which one of the musicians she got to know at the Tyrone Guthrie Centre was performing.

Self attended a fundraising concert at the Button Factory in Dublin, in June.

Self attended a fundraising concert at the Button Factory in Dublin, in June.

Stay tuned, dear blog readers.  Stay tuned.

Contrasts 5: WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge

Examples of CONTRASTS from artwork currently on exhibit at the Cantor Art Center, Stanford University campus.

ALL artists succeed by working off contrasts:  contrasts of color, contrasts of shapes, contrasts of mediums (mixed media, collages, and so forth), contrasts of texture.

Here are three of self’s favorites:  Julian Schnabel.  Wayne Thiebaud.  Frank Stella.

Julian Schnabel, USA, b. 1951:  "Portrait of Hope Makler, 1989" at Cantor Art Center, Stanford campus

Julian Schnabel, USA, b. 1951: “Portrait of Hope Makler, 1989″ at Cantor Art Center, Stanford campus

Wayne Thiebaud, USA, b. 1920:  "Lunch Table, 1964" at Cantor Art Center, Stanford campus

Wayne Thiebaud, USA, b. 1920: “Lunch Table, 1964″ at Cantor Art Center, Stanford campus

Frank Stella, USA, b. 1936:  "Nightgown 1990" (On wall)

Frank Stella, USA, b. 1936: “Nightgown 1990″ (On wall)

Stay tuned, dear blog readers.  Stay tuned.

Growing Up on Park Avenue (During the Depression)

The following passage is from Diane Arbus: A Chronology, 1923 – 1971.

Self stumbled across this book in April, after attending an Arbus exhibit at the Fraenkel Art Gallery, in downtown San Francisco.

In the summer of 1929, just before the stock market crash, Arbus’s family moved into 1185 Park Avenue.

This is from a radio interview conducted by Studs Terkel in 1968, for his book Hard Times:  An Oral History of the Great Depression.

The family fortune always seemed to me humiliating.  When I had to go into that store . . . I would come on somebody’s arm or holding somebody’s hand at what must have been a fairly young age and it was like being a princess in some loathsome movie of some kind of Transylvanian obscure middle European country and the kingdom was so humiliating.

Stay tuned, dear blog readers.  Stay tuned.

 

Extra Extra 4: WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge

On the train back to Dublin from Sligo, self’s last full day in Ireland:

The sky, of course:  the sky makes this picture.

The sky, of course: the sky makes this picture.

A painting by Janet Pierce, who self met at the Tyrone Guthrie Centre in Annaghmakerrig.  Janet’s paintings are currently on exhibit at the Hamilton Gallery in Sligo, through Aug. 9.

The window, of course: The window is the "something extra."

The window, of course: The window is the “something extra.”

The artist herself:

The "Something Extra":  The hand, the smile, the armful of yellow roses

The “Something Extra”: The hand, the smile, the armful of yellow roses

Stay tuned, dear blog readers.  Stay tuned.

Seeing a Bird (After Leaving the Chester Beatty Museum)

DSCN5908

The Chester Beatty turns out to be right next to Dublin Castle (Dame Street, Stop # 9 on the Hop On/Hop Off red tour bus), and there is no admission fee.

Self loved the museum.  It’s possibly the most interesting museum she’s seen (yet) in Ireland.

It turns out to be highly focused on the book as a work of art.

There are many, many examples of Chinese, Japanese, and Arabic writing (calligraphy), some thousands of years old.

And there’s also one section on Moghul (Indian) art that seems to be highly focused on animals and all kinds of fabulous creatures.  And that’s why she spent much time photographing birds in a park afterwards.

Which led self to wonder if it was worth exploring the Dublin Zoo.  So just now she googled the Dublin Zoo and found that it is “Ireland’s most popular tourist attraction.”

Which is amazing, because self thought the Book of Kells would have been “Ireland’s most popular tourist attraction.”

The zoo has just welcomed its first “Rothschild giraffe calf.”  Which is amazing.  Not the part about welcoming the giraffe calf, but that the giraffe is actually called the “Rothschild giraffe.”

She wonders if, one day, she’ll see something about a “Wells Fargo elephant” in San Francisco Zoo.

Stay tuned, dear blog readers.  Stay tuned.

Twist 4: WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge

Shortly before leaving for Ireland, self wandered over to the Cantor Art Center on the Stanford campus, where she took these shots.  Gerald B. Cantor, who donated the funds, was someone self interviewed when she was just a lowly student reporter for The Stanford Daily.  You can actually see her byline if you go all the way back to the year the Cantor Art Center was opened.

The interview happened this way.  Mr. Cantor himself was standing on the steps of the Art Center.  A crush of reporters were holding microphones up to his face and yelling questions.  Since self is rather petite, barely even five feet tall, she was all the way in the back.  But she did have the perspicacity to yell, at the top of her lungs, STANFORD DAILY!

Mr. Cantor held up his hand.  Everyone fell silent.  Then he looked over at the crowd of reporters and asked, “Who said Stanford Daily?”  And self piped up, from all the way in the back, “I did.”

And he said, “Let her through.”

And the crowd of reporters parted.  And self, blushing furiously, was ushered all the way to the front.

And that, honest to God, is how self got to shake the great man’s hand.

Many, many years later, self thought of him again, because the Cantor Fitzgerald management company occupied the top three floors of one of the World Trade Center buildings, and sekf heard that the firm lost a stupefying 1,600 of its employees on 9/11.

Rodin Sculpture Garden, on the Stanford campus

Rodin Sculpture Garden, on the Stanford campus

A giant head in the Rodin Sculpture Garden (Behind is one of the engineering buildings)

A giant head in the Rodin Sculpture Garden (Behind is one of the engineering buildings, and they’re getting ready to add yet another)

Still another from the Rodin Sculpture Garden

Still another from the Rodin Sculpture Garden

Stay tuned, dear blog readers.  Stay tuned.

 

 

 

Twist: WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge

This week’s WordPress Photo Challenge is TWIST.

Which is a deliciously challenging theme, obvio.u.s.ly !

The first one is a different kind of twist:  a serendipitous discovery in Culver City, California.

The next two are of actual twists: one in a piece of art, another found in nature.

Tara's Himalayan Restaurant, Culver City. Thanks much to Jennie and Andrew for taking her here! It was her first taste of Himalayan cuisine: funny she should find it in southern California, of all places!

Tara’s Himalayan Restaurant, Culver City. Thanks much to Jennie and Andrew for taking her here! It was her first taste of Himalayan cuisine: funny she should find it in southern California, of all places!

Tapestry by Filipino artist Ugu Bigyan. Self brought it home from the Philippines over 20 years ago. U.S. Customs asked her what it was, she answered "A hammock." They let it go.

Tapestry by Filipino artist Ugu Bigyan. Self brought it home from the Philippines over 20 years ago. U.S. Customs asked her what it was, she answered “A hammock.” They let it go.

This is what's left after the clematis petals have fallen off. SO beautiful.

This is what’s left after the clematis petals have fallen off. SO beautiful.

Stay tuned, dear blog readers.  Stay tuned.

 

 

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