2013 Top Ten Books of the San Francisco Chronicle

Of the five fiction, the one by Donna Tartt leaves self cold.  Self was excited about Rachel Kushner’s until she discovered it was set in the “heady 1970s.”  Self has lived through the 1970s, and the word “heady” really does not apply.  Here are the three self wants to read:

  • A Constellation of Vital Phenomena, by Anthony Marra (Hogarth):  The SF Chronicle calls it “an astounding debut novel . . .  told with great empathy . . . “
  • The Good Lord Bird, by James McBride (Riverhead):  Self has read two previous books by this author, and liked them both.  The SF Chronicle says:  “It might seem like an absurd set-up — a satirical yarn about a cross-dressing freed slave boy fighting alongside John Brown — but McBride pulls it off in this hoot of a novel . . . “
  • Tenth of December:  Stories, by George Saunders (Random House):  Ever read CivilWarLand in Bad Decline?  Self thought that book was a game-changer.  In one stroke, changed the landscape of the contemporary American short story, which until then had been Raymond Carver/Lydia Davis.  She will read anything by George Saunders.  Anything.

Of the Nonfiction, self skips over the story of The Black Russian, as she doesn’t find nonfiction about Russia as compelling as fiction about Russia, who knows why.  And though Jesmyn Ward’s book (self heard) is a powerhouse, she wants to delve into something other than “poverty and violence.”  And the third book she skips, by Eric Schlosser, is about nuclear accidents.  And since there’s not much self can think of to stop nuclear accidents (other than banning nuclear power), she thinks reading Schlosser’s book might just be an exercise in frustration.

Here are the two nonfiction self would like to read:

  • Book of Ages:  The Life and Opinions of Jane Franklin, by Jill Lepore (Knopf):  Because Ben Franklin had a sister.  And it’s high time people found out.
  • Thank You For Your Service, by David Finkel (Farrar, Straus and Giroux):  “Much has been written about the lingering effects of war on American soldiers who have come home, but Finkel’s narrative of time spent with these men and their families has a singular emotional depth.”

Stay tuned, dear blog readers.  Stay tuned.

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