Kathryn Bigelow, by Way of Salon.com

If Kathryn Bigelow never did anything else, for the rest of her life, she would still go down in history as the woman who made two of the best war movies of our time.

Since self is such a maven for lists, she decides to list all the war movies of recent memory that made the deepest impression on her.  They include:

  • Black Book, directed by Paul Verhoeven
  • Henry V, directed by Kenneth Branagh
  • Kagemusha, directed by Akira Kurosawa
  • Platoon, directed by Oliver Stone
  • Schindler’s List, directed by Steven Spielberg
  • The Boy in the Striped Pajamas, directed by Mark Herman
  • The Deer Hunter, directed by Michael Cimino
  • The Last of the Mohicans, directed by Michael Mann
  • Three Kings, directed by David O. Russell

All of the movies in the above list were directed by men, so Bigelow’s achievement is huge.  HUGE.

Salon.com movie critic Andrew O’Hehir selected Zero Dark Thirty as one of the best movies of 2012.  Apparently, there’s a controversy over the torture scenes, something to do with a State Department denial that torture was ever used to extract information that led to the killing of Osama bin Laden.

O’Hehir posted today about the New York Film Critics Circle’s annual dinner with Hollywood celebs.  Bigelow was one of the invited speakers, and O’Hehir quotes her as saying she was “grateful to be in a room of people who understand that depiction is not endorsement, and if it was, no artist could ever portray inhumane practices.”  Very well put, in self’s humble opinion.

But there’s more:

“As for her unwillingness to discuss her specific intentions, she joked, we had to remember that she came from the visual art world, where the goal is always to obfuscate rather than explain.”

Wow, she is eloquent, isn’t she?

Stay tuned, dear blog readers.  Stay tuned.

2 Comments

  1. January 9, 2013 at 4:08 pm

    Wow, I am also a war movie junkie -

    Kyi

  2. January 9, 2013 at 4:46 pm

    I think the war movie appeals to my sense of the dramatic. Even better that the stories are (for the most part) based on true events (Yes, I realize KAGEMUSHA is fictional — ! I included it because I can never forget the opening scene, a messenger scurrying through a battlefield)


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